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Fall 2019 Courses

English Courses

ENGL 200 Introduction to English Studies--Barnes crn 25971

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For BOTH English majors, this is 1 of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out.” —Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar  (1963)

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”  —Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)

 What does it mean to be an English major or an English minor? What can you do with this program of study? My favorite writers—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller—might hear Transcendentalist echoes reverberating in these questions and in the answers academics tend to pose nowadays. These Concordians would probably level serious critiques at our evermore sub-specializing field, but they would probably also be intrigued with our current desires for disciplinary “cohesion,” to invoke Walt Whitman, and interdisciplinary scholarship. For Emerson, “The American Scholar” is a person of action in the world. In this spirit, we’ll start by re-framing those first two provocations: not just what it might mean to be a major/minor or what you can do (modally inflected make-a-living verb) with a B.A. in English, but also what we do (philosophically, practically) as liberally educated people in the process. Thoreau might chime in, querying how this degree and this experience make us “live deliberately.” In this course, we will—to riff on the trees/ woods/living deliberately conceit that runs amuck across this course, and to paraphrase Sylvia Plath’s Esther Greenwood—talk about how to pick good figs for ourselves.

English 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation, and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate sub-fields of English Studies, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field.


ENGL 211 Editing and Publishing Practicum: The Pen--Malphrus crn 25974

Pre-req. ENGL 102 and 200-level English course (may be co-req.) or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times. [When taken 3 times, the credits count toward humanities program requirement; otherwise, credits are applied as electives.]

The Pen, the  two-time national award winning publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Come, join us!  Previous or Concurrent Experience in a Creative Writing Workshop Preferred. 


ENGL 222 Creative Writing Across the Curriculum--Malphrus crn 25976

Pre-req. ENGL 102 or instructor consent. Counts as humanities program requirement, toward the Creative Writing Minor, or as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

English 222 is an introductory level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their imagination and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well)—and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words.


ENGL 270 World Literature--McCoy crn 25977

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For BOTH English majors, this is 1 of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

A whole new world! A new fantastic point of view! - Famous Quote

World Literature satisfies the Non-Western Gen Ed, required for English, English Ed, and Education majors - sustains a broad reach over texts from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. We learn about magic in the Dominican Republic, travel from war-torn Somalia to South Africa, explore the multiple farces of colonized Vietnam, and check out Iran in the midst of a revolution! Designed to delight, dazzle, and dare, World Literature also includes music and art from around the world, and a curation of the course's final projects can be found in the display case in the library - sign up today!


ENGL/THEA 301 Theater History I--Pate crn 25981 (THEA); crn 25979 (ENGL)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward the theater minor and either English major and all English minors as a PRE-1800 course or upper-division elective.

A study of the development of Western theatrical texts and practices including playwriting, acting, and design from ancient Greece to 1800.


ENGL 412 Victorian Literature--Hoffer crn 25983

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

“I at least have so much to do in unraveling certain human lots, and seeing how they were woven and interwoven, that all the light I can command must be concentrated on this particular web, and not dispersed over that tempting range of relevancies called the universe” --George Eliot, Middlemarch

The Social Network:  Literary Macrocosms & Microcosms in Victorian Literature. In an era where realism ruled, authors such as George Eliot and Charles Dickens created panoramic fictional worlds featuring comprehensive networks or “webs” of characters and the complex “human lots”— plots!—that traced the intersections of these fictional lives. Novels such as Bleak House  (1852) and Middlemarch (1871) offer representations of Victorian culture in macrocosm, seeming to portray every nook and cranny of the social schema and emphasizing interconnectivity and causality within it. While these writers do focus their “light” on certain corners of these constructed “universes,” it is in many ways the situating of these specific narratives within the greater “range of relevancies” that produces meaning—both for Victorian readers and for us. In the midst of these sweeping multi-plot texts, other novelists focused on more remote, more tightly “woven and interwoven” renderings of their world in miniature. The provincial microcosms of Wuthering Heights (1847) and Cranford (1853) offer their readers a different view, carving out a sampling from the larger cosmos to examine lives and times in isolation. By forgoing any sustained treatment of the larger landscape in which their autonomous, tide pool-like communities exist, writers such as Emily Brontë and Elizabeth Gaskell implicitly address the macrocosm through microcosm, essentially mimicking the way we actually experience the world around us.

Immersing themselves in these sprawling macrocosms and intimate, detached microcosms, Victorian readers could explore their world mirrored back to them in the hopes of grasping the intricate workings of an increasingly complex social, economic, technological, and political landscape. Realist novels, in this sense, functioned in much the same way that digital social media culture does today. From the “News Feed” and YouTube channels to the vast, chirping Twitter universe, we enact the same cultural curiosity and investment in social networks. In this course, we will focus on literary representations of social networks, exploring what it means to be an individual in and out of society, how social institutions shape our identities and everyday lives, and how social networks can connect or isolate us. Required texts: Charles Dickens’s Bleak House, George Eliot’s Middlemarch, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights, and Elizabeth Gaskell’s Cranford, as well as selected scholarship from both the Victorian period and our own.


English 425A The American Novel to 1914--Barnes crn 25986

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

In this course, we’ll study the novel as a form, as it unfolds across the long nineteenth century. I’m still percolating our course through-lines, but we’ll no doubt address one elephant in the room: what does “The Great American Novel” mean? how have people applied this term to texts that could be included in our course? what do we mean “Great”? by “America”? how do those words shape our interpretations of what a or “The” “Novel” is? what reading practices we bring to it? why is/isn’t this label useful for us? how do our texts resist or reveal such expectations? I’ll also want us to think seriously about the conflation people often make between the “novel” and the “book,” especially since our studies will often direct us to the relationship between our texts and the periodical print cultures that circulated and popularized them. One idea I’m teasing out along these lines—that’ll help us think about social class in terms of our texts’ characters and most immediate readers—has to do with “rags-to-riches” (or the other way around) novels. Another has to do with form: novels whose narrative qualities seem to divide them into separate parts or storylines. I’m still finalizing our list (it’ll be about five novels), but here’s what I’m playing with, pie-in-the-sky style: 

Susanna Rowson’s Charlotte Temple (1791); Hannah Webster Foster’s The Coquette; or, the History of Eliza Wharton (1797); Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s Clarence; or, A Tale of Our Times (1830/1849); William Wells Brown’s Clotel; or, The President’s Daughter; Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1868–1869); William Dean Howells’s The Rise of Silas Lapham (1885) or The Hazard of New Fortunes  (1889); María Amparo Ruiz de Burton’s The Squatter and the Don (1885); Henry James’s The Bostonians (1886) or The Wings of the Dove (1902); Pauline Hopkins’s Contending Forces (1900) or one of The Magazine Novels (1901–1903); Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie (1900); Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth (1905); Sui Sin Far’s Mrs. Spring Fragrance (1912); James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man (1912). USCB ETIS literati: please let me know if you are keen to read some of these in particular—and/or other novels from this period. We’ll also dip our toes into histories and theories of the novel beyond our studies of the novels and their specific critical materials.  


ENGL 432 Literature for Young Adults--TBA crn 25991

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. *REQUIRED FOR THE SECONDARY ED. DEGREE.* Also counts toward the core English major and all English minors as an upper-division elective

Literature written for and about adolescents. More to come!


English 453 Development of the English Language--Swofford crn 25992

Pre-req. ENGL 102. *REQUIRED FOR THE SECONDARY ED. DEGREE.*  Counts as an upper-division elective or toward the Language Program Requirement for the core B.A. in English and toward the Professional Writing Concentration or minor.

We hear many complaints that “texting is ruining the English language.” Such complaints are not new. In 1387, Ranulph Higden fretted about the influence of the Danes and Normans on English and the ways their “chattering” brought bad habits into the language. It’s clear that English has always been changing, and has, in fact, changed dramatically enough that we as Modern English speakers can barely understand those who first began to call their language “English” and created written records of poems such as Beowulf. In this course, we will do a broad sweep of the English language’s history, focusing on the changes in the structure of the language, but also the stories of the cultures and speakers who make it such a rich and fascinating subject. The course will balance attention to the technicalities of historical linguistic developments and serious engagement with theories of language diversity and change—including how “standard language” and “grammar instruction” developed in the history of English and how language ideologies shape the history we tell. Languages are inextricably connected to the people who speak them, so we’ll be discussing attitudes about dialects (especially local dialects/languages like Southern English, African-American English, and Gullah), and we’ll work through tricky questions about how all of this knowledge should affect the ways that we teach and learn English and English/Language Arts.

Along the way, we will also address a variety of intriguing linguistic questions such as: Where did the pronoun she come from? (And why is it the Word of the Millennium?) When did double negation become non-standard, and who first said (erroneously) that two negatives make a positive? Why is colonel spelled the way it is and yet pronounced “kernel”? How did English spelling become, according to linguist Mario Pei, the “world’s most awesome mess”? Why and how do “living” languages change? Bring a genuine curiosity about the details of language and how language changes, and a willingness to dig into the messy business of understanding how the English language came to be. 


ENGL 461 Writing in the Health Professions--Leaphart crn 25993

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward the core B.A. in English as upper-division elective or toward the Professional Writing Concentration or minor

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.


 ENGL 464 Poetry Workshop--Malphrus crn 25994

Pre-req. 200-level course, preferably ENGL 222, or instructor's consent. Counts toward the core B.A. in English as upper-division elective or toward the Creative Writing Concentration or minor. With permission from the instructor, 464 can be taken twice for credit.

“A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance,” said James Dickey.  If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.  The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills.  In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world.  Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.  


 

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

IDST 297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods [ONLINE, Full Term]
McCoy 

Pre-req. ENGL 102. This course is REQUIRED for the Interdisciplinary Studies major or Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Looking for a course that allows for maximum exploration of your ideas and your aspirations but takes up a minimal amount of your time? Ready to blog? Thinking of taking a major in one discipline (like Biology) and a minor in another (like English) and wondering how they'll work together? You're invited to take IDST B297: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods! You'll be blogging and thinking, all about what interests you and what you want to do! Come join us!


IDST 397 Readings in Philosophy--McCoy crn 26013

Pre-req. Interdisciplinary Studies major or instructor's consent; junior standing.

What events - philosophy - created the horrors of the Holocaust? Fascists really dug Nietzsche - Hitler notably gave Mussolini Nietzsche's complete works - but would Nietzsche have agreed with the Nazi's interpretation of his ideas? And while it's easy to blame the Nazis for the Holocaust, who else is to blame? We'll read Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem: The Banality of Evil and talk about community culpability, often examining people we thought innocent. Finally, we'll check out the point of view of German children and teenagers who lived in World War II-era Europe - and often were witnesses to the Holocaust in terrible ways. This thoughtful examination of a horrible human experience aims to equip us with new ways to view group behavior, racism, and common morality.


IDST 497 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies Among the Disciplines [ONLINE, Full Term]--McCoy crn 26014

Pre-req. Senior standing in Interdisciplinary Studies major.

Senior thesis course, required for IDST majors. Open to IDST majors ONLY.


 

 Theater Courses

THEA 170 Fundamentals of Acting--Ricardo crn 25995 (MWF 9am) or crn 25996 (MWF 10am)

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

You don't have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.


THEA 200 Understanding & Appreciation of Theater--TBA crn 25997

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We'll look at Western theater's roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater's place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.


 THEA/ENGL 201 Introduction to Script Analysis--Pate crn 25998

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

 In this course, students will apply research and analysis skills to dramatic texts with an eye toward serving theatrical productions.

THEA/ENGL 301 Theater History I--Pate crn 25981 (THEA); crn 25979 (ENGL)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward the theater minor. Also counts toward both English majors, and all English minors as a PRE-1800 course or upper-division elective.

A study of the development of Western theatrical texts and practices including playwriting, acting, and design from ancient Greece to 1800.

 

Spring 2019 Courses

English Courses

ENGL 180 Introduction to Film
McQuillen crn 57551

Pre-req. ENGL 101. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective for students of any major and for the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Film is one of the three universal languages, the other two: mathematics and music. --Frank Capra

Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls. --Ingmar Bergman

Film…what is it about these dancing images that makes them so universal or something that penetrates our souls? Why do we spend countless hours arguing the merits of one film over another? Which is the better musical, the fun loving, crowd pleaser The Greatest Showman or the vibrant, romantic and melancholy masterpiece Moulin Rogue (we all know it's Moulin Rogue!)? How exactly do we talk about film in a manner that melds both our personal passions with those of academic discourse? ENGL 180 aims to answer these questions via the study of a wide range of films and film language at the introductory level. Students will learn the importance of terms like mise-en-scene, editing, sound, cinematography, and apply them to old classics such as Jaws and 2001: A Space Odyssey to more recent classics like Ex Machina and La La Land. So, if you have a desire to know more about what makes films tick, take ENGL 180: Intro to Film!


ENGL 211-001 Editing and Publishing Practicum—The Pen Malphrus crn 53366

Pre-req. ENGL 102 and 200-level English course (may be co-req.) or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times. [When taken 3 times, the credits count toward humanities program requirement; otherwise, credits are applied as electives.]

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." ~Benjamin Franklin

The Pen, a publication of the USCB Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative works, evaluate submissions, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself.


ENGL 211-002 Editing and Publishing Practicum—May River Review
Barnes & Hoffer crn 53358

Pre-req. ENGL 102 and 200-level English course (may be co-req.) or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times. [When taken 3 times, the credits count toward humanities program requirement; otherwise, credits are applied as electives.]

Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the fourth issue and the production of the fifth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts).


ENGL 222 Creative Writing Across the Curriculum Malphrus crn 53376

Pre-req. ENGL 102 or instructor consent. Counts as humanities program requirement, toward the Creative Writing Minor, or as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

"Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go." ~E.L. Doctorow

Ready to explore? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101, 102, and a desire to mess around with words.


ENGL B287 American Literature Survey
Barnes crn 53356

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2019? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature(Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.


ENGL B288 English Literature I
Kilgore crn 53361

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

The British and the World. One reason to care about early literature in early versions of the English language: on March 29, 2019, the United Kingdom (UK) is scheduled to exit the European Union (EU), a.k.a., to "leave Europe," "Brexit." The debate about Brexit has largely been cultural, about the UK's relationships with the rest of the world and its tensions within (can you call this Brexit if the majority of Scots didn't want to leave?; how does it feel to be both Black and British when English white nationalismis on the rise?), and has controversially drawn upon the foundation myths and literary notables of British history: King ArthurShakespeareChaucerHenry VIII, Elizabeth the First, and the Second. Even the nearly thousand-year old Bayeux Tapestry, made to celebrate the Norman Conquest of Britain, has become a diplomatic point of contention. Using "Brexit" as a point of departure, this course will provide you an overview of British literatures, cultures, and histories from the ancient stone circles to just before 1800. You will build your skills and confidence in literary reading, interpretation, and analysis. You will be encouraged to explore and question ideas of culture, history, aesthetics, and literature (specifically the literary study of "British" views of the individual in society, and the possibilities for varieties of social justice), to test these ideas against your own thinking and experience, and to build skills in reading, writing, and presentation. We will read Beowulf; Anglo-Saxon elegies and dirty jokes; some Arthurian romance, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton; and a lot of poetry about conquest and struggle and love and leaving from as diverse a group of authors that we can manage. We will explore the "People of Color in European Art History" blog. On one day in class, you will host your own news program, or The View (maybe wearing a costume?) and report from within a text we are reading (we will assume they have the technology.) How we think about "Britain" across time has profound implications for how we understand American literatures, cultures, histories, institutions, ourselves; the narratives we tell about ourselves and our societies matter -- this course will build your skills, your confidence, and is part of that exploration. Text: Norton Anthology of English Literature, 10th edition, Volumes A, B, and C. (WW Norton, 2018). See the flyer!


ENGL B289 English Literature II
Hoffer crn 53359

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

Living & Learning in British Literature since 1789. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (a broad overview) of major writers and works of British literature from the late 18th to the 21st century. In spring 2019, we will be guided in our grand tour of this literary tradition by a pair of interrelated central questions: 1) How did the British conceive of different forms of and approaches to education and learning in everyday life? and 2) What role could reading and writing, nature and art, play in the development of an individual, of a community, and of a nation? Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology as well as encounter major literary movements and cultural moments, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335), with a few additional texts still under consideration!


ENGL/THEA 302 Theater History II
Pate crn 53383 (ENGL)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as well as theater minor as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We'll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We'll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We'll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater's desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We'll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don't let the 2 fool you; there's no need to take Theater History 1 before you take this course.


ENGL 410 18th Century Literature
Hoffer crn 53360 

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a PRE-1800 course or upper-division elective.

Adventures in 18th Century Literature. ENGL 410 will take students on a comprehensive journey through the literature of the 18th century, specifically from the accession of George I and the publication of Alexander Pope's revised The Rape of the Lock in 1714 to the start of the French Revolution in 1789. We will organize our reading around the concept of adventureencountering the daring spirit of 18th century authors whose lives, views, and (most importantly, for us) writing exemplify the boldness to question, challenge, and innovate within the prevailing opinion and style of their time. We will also plot our course among poetry and prose that depict some form of adventure—from a shipwreck on the high seas, or the terrors of a gothic castle, to the complexities of city-life and high society. Along our way, as we encounter various groups and movements (such as the Augustans, Graveyard Poets, the founders of the English novel) and study a variety of important techniques and genres (satire, sentimental, gothic, epistolary, etc.), we will explore how the greatest adventures of 18thcentury literature are about discovering what it means to be humanAs we survey 18th century concepts of personhood and citizenship against their cultural context concerning gender, class, race, religion, trade, law, science, war, and national identifications, we will connect these to the contemporary ideologies of our own, global terrain in the 21st century. Required texts to include Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Horace Walpole's gothic The Castle of Otranto, and Fanny Burney's Evelina, as well as The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. C: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century.


English 420 Transatlantic Literature
Barnes crn 53407

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

Armchair Travel. Why do people write travelogues? do people think about the world (or their place in the world) differently when travelling? In this transatlantic literature course, we'll study travelogues of many stripes—guidebooks, public and private letters, journals kept by authors in fictional and nonfictional poses, diaries, short stories, and "international novels"—as texts that demonstrate how elusive words may be. People document their travels in many different contexts and for many different reasons, and yet at some point, almost all wanderlustful writers confess a sense of wordlessness. While many people begin travelogues to record their in situ impressions of artworks, landmarks, monuments, or other historical sites, many also find the process of transcribing impressions into paragraphs, sentences, dashed-off phrases to be almost impossible. Indeed, travelogues reveal writers' immediate diversions, tangents, failed articulations as often as they trace what are supposed to be lasting recollections. We'll take such rhetorical pauses seriously by studying the ways narrative expectations, conventions, and modes affect representations of travel. As we read excerpts from travelogues new and old, famous and almost anonymous, we'll linger over the surprising ways the trivial inspires the existential (or the other way around)—especially when we're away from home. We'll address the generic complexities of nonfiction travelogues, which often seem to be part tell-all, part tell-nothing, part autobiography, part documentary, part scrapbook, and part introspective meandering. As we read these nineteenth-century texts from home, in books and on screens, we'll think about how media affects meaning—how the rise of middle-class travel, what some have called the "not-so-grand-tour," reveals itself in texts that revise and resist literary forms/genres/modes. At the same time, we'll study the ways travel writing raises difficult—and increasingly urgent—questions about power; so our conversations will be necessarily intersectional. Our projects will cross guide books with smart phone maps; telegrams with instagrams; letters and postcards with snaps and updates; personal essays with much more public inscriptions. Ultimately, we'll consider how our own digital ephemera revive tropes from a century and a half ago when travelogues first came into widely circulated vogue.

Our travel guides will likely include Charles Dickens, Margaret Fuller, Henry James, Anna Jameson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Martineau, Fanny Trollope, and Mark Twain in starring roles; and cameos by some helpful interpreters: Mary Louise Pratt, James Buzzard. (Map of the World. By Anna M. Bullard. Boston. March 15, 1836. Western Hemisphere. Eastern Hemisphere. Image from the David Rumsey Map Collection.)


ENGL 427 Southern Literature
Malphrus crn 56771

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

"Whenever I'm asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one." ~ Flannery O'Connor

Who are the writers that have shaped Southern Literature? When did Southern Literature emerge? Where does the South begin and end – is it all about the Mason-Dixon Line? How can we tell if a particular text is Southern or not? Why do readers, writers, scholars, and the general public around the world continue to be fascinated by all things Southern? . . .These are some of the initial questions we'll address in this upper level seminar on Southern Literature. In addition to top guns such as William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor, we will focus our attention specifically on South Carolina writers – from William Gilmore Simms to Henry Timrod to Mary Boykin Chesnut to Julia Peterkin to DuBose Heyward to James Dickey to Percival Everett to Josephine Humphreys to Dorothy Allison to Nikky Finney to Pat Conroy to Ron Rash – some briefly, others in more depth. Literary roots run deep in the Palmetto state, and we'll spend the semester digging around in them. Here are the novels we'll read: James Dickey, Deliverance (ISBN: 0-385-31387-X); William Faulkner, Go Down, Moses (ISBN: 0-679-73217-9); Gloria Naylor, Mama Day (ISBN: 0-679-72181-9); Ron Rash, One Foot in Eden (ISBN:0-312-42305-5); Pat Conroy, The Prince of Tides (ISBN-10: 0553268880). Please note: this is Post-1800 class or an elective.


ENGL 441 History of Literary Theory & Criticism
Kilgore crn 53362

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward the THEORY requirement for either English major, OR as an upper-division elective for all English majors and minors.

Literature & Justice. This course is an introduction to literary theory in the Western tradition from the Greeks onward. We will spend some time on the Greeks (Homer, Plato, Aristotle) because they frame the conversation to follow, and because these are "writers" that later writers—and students of them—will seek to disrupt. We will read a range of writers who have sought to describe what literature is and how it functions in society. Their conclusions are not obvious (and are often not really conclusions, but disruptions) and curious minds will be necessary for this odyssey. Our explorations will entertain many of the following questions: What is literature / fiction / myth / poetry? What is it good for? How is it dangerous? What is its relationship with truth? beauty? rhetoric? inspiration? craft? wisdom? power? the Other? justice? —especially justice. We'll read Emily Wilson's exciting new (feminist?) translation of Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Butler's Parable of the Sower— the following are not lengthy—Aristotle's Poetics, Longinus' On Great Writing, Philip Sidney's Defence of Poesy, and (through small chunks of text on Blackboard) some Horace, Christine de Pizan, Kant, Shelley, Emerson, Hegel, Marx, Derrida, and Eagleton! Once the course is through, you'll have a good historical understanding of the debates and the means to enter into ongoing conversations about the roles of literatures in societies, and have a deep appreciation for how the concepts and practices of justice has always been central to these conversations. See the flyer - Click here for the course flyer and book list with ISBNs.


English 450 Modern English Grammars 
Swofford crn 53406

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Required for the Secondary English Education major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the core B.A. in English and toward the Professional Writing Concentration or minor.

The very title of this course may cause some of you great anxiety. You may have been told that you're "not good at grammar," you may have had grades that were affected by your use of "grammar," or you may be worried that there are rules you should know but don't. Take heart! This course offers a different perspective on "grammar." All native speakers of English actually "know grammar" intuitively—that's how we're able to communicate with one another every day. What most of us struggle more with is identifying the rules or conventions of Standard Edited English. In this class, we will unpack the structures and systems of English so that you are able to explain what you know with more precise terminology. We will examine the gamut of English language variation, not so that we learn the "right" way to speak and write, but so that we understand the vast array of options that are available to us as English speakers. We will look at the patterns that comprise Standard English, but we'll also identify patterns in regional and social dialects like African-American English, Southern American English, and Chicano English. We'll then examine Global Englishes and speculate about the future of the language.

English is a wonderfully rich, robust, and idiosyncratic language, and understanding how it works gives us access to its fullest potential. When we understand how English works, how it is structured and the richness of its variety, we become aware of the possibilities it offers us as writers, as readers, and as speakers. We unlock its infinite creativity and its reassuring patterns. In this course, we'll ask questions like: Where do our "rules" come from? Why do we believe them? How and when do they change? Why can we say slower and cuter, but funner seems incorrect? Can we end a sentence with a preposition? This course fulfills one of the requirements for the B.A. in English with Secondary Education licensure, and it is one of options for the Professional Writing minor/concentration. All majors are very welcome in this course!


ENGL 465 Fiction Workshop
Malphrus crn 53368

Pre-req. 200-level course, preferably ENGL 222, or instructor's consent. Counts toward the core B.A. in English as upper-division elective or toward the Creative Writing Concentration or minor. With permission from the instructor, can be taken twice for credit.

"The purpose of fiction is to help us answer the question we must constantly be asking ourselves: who do we think we are and what do we think we're doing?" ~Robert Stone

If this two part question makes your fingers twitch, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand a student's awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

IDST 260 Introduction to Medical & Health Humanities [ONLINE, Full Term]
Leaphart crn 53365

Pre-req. ENGL 102 or instructor's consent. This course can also count toward the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Have you ever thought about why health, healthcare, and medical topics are often associated with the words complex and perplexing? One key to understanding these topics is to consider that at the center of health and medicine is the human. This ONLINE class will use a variety of methods -including short videos, readings, and movies- to help students look deeply at complex systems they will assuredly experience during their lifetimes. No matter whether students will be concerned with the care of patients, or family members, or simply their own health care, this class allows students to dig deeper into the complexities and understand the ongoing tension between the biomedical and the biopsychosocial models to better prepare for the future. We'll use the humanities to explore those murky depths and reveal a better understanding of health and medicine, including but not limited to health disparities, health literacy, and cultural competencies. Students will also use that knowledge to move beyond the "online classroom" to analyze and engage in the systems of health and medicine in their communities. Whether you're interested in health and medicine from a professional vantage or you are looking for an interesting and relevant class, this is a great fit for your spring!


IDST 297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods [ONLINE, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53370

Pre-req. ENGL 102. This course is required for the Interdisciplinary Studies major or Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Looking for a course that allows for maximum exploration of your ideas and your aspirations but takes up a minimal amount of your time? Ready to blog? Thinking of taking a major in one discipline (like Biology) and a minor in another (like English) and wondering how they'll work together? You're invited to take IDST B297: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods! You'll be blogging and thinking, all about what interests you and what you want to do! Come join us!


IDST 351 Beyond the Classroom: Community Project I [Hybrid, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53371

Pre-req. Interdisciplinary Studies major or instructor's consent; junior standing.

We're going to read to kids in elementary schools and get out in the community. We're going to talk about it and blog about it and do fun projects with the kids about how they see the community. We'll do some of this work online, and we'll meet in person as well.


IDST 497 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies Among the Disciplines [ONLINE, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53372

Pre-req. Senior standing in Interdisciplinary Studies major.
Senior thesis course, required for IDST majors. Open to IDST majors ONLY.

 

Theater Courses

THEA 170 Fundamentals of Acting
Ricardo or Harris

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

You don't have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.


THEA 200 Understanding & Appreciation of Theater
Harris crn 53352

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We'll look at Western theater's roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater's place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.


THEA/ENGL 302 Theater History II
Pate crn 53384 (THEA)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward the theater minor. Also counts toward both English majors, and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We'll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We'll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We'll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater's desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We'll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don't let the 2 fool you; there's no need to take Theater History 1 before you take this course.


THEA 333 Directing
Ricardo crn 53388

Pre-req. THEA 170 or instructor's consent. Counts toward the theater minor.

What do directors do? They conceptualize productions. They communicate with actors, designers, producers, and audiences. They read and interpret scripts. They are managers and teachers and artists and custodians of texts and iconoclasts. This class will train you in the art of directing plays while also asking you to study that role, its history, its challenges, its opportunities, its implications for how and why we make theater. You will start with simple assignments such as arranging actors in space to create a stage picture and build toward the final project of directing an entire scene from a play. You will also write a report on a professional director that analyses her directing style and methods.

 

Fall 2018 Courses

ENGL 180 Introduction to Film McQuillen crn 25059

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and for the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Film is one of the three universal languages, the other two: mathematics and music. --Frank Capra

Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls. --Ingmar Bergman

Film…what is it about these dancing images that makes them so universal or something that penetrates our souls? Why do we spend countless hours arguing the merits of one film over another? How exactly do we talk about film in a manner that melds both our personal passions with those of academic discourse? ENGL 180 aims to answer these questions via the study of a wide range of films and film language at the introductory level. Students will learn the importance of terms like mise-en-scene, editing, sound, cinematography, and apply them to old classics such as Jaws and 2001 to more recent classics like Ex Machina and La La Land. So, if you have a desire to know more about what makes films tick, take ENGL 180: Intro to Film!

English 200 Introduction to English Studies Barnes  crn 25076

Pre-requisite: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor.

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story.

From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out.”
Sylvia PlathThe Bell Jar (1963)

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.”
—Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)

What does it mean to be an English major or an English minor? What can you do with this program of study? My favorite writers—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller—might hear Transcendentalist echoes reverberating in these questions and in the answers academics tend to pose nowadays. These Concordians would probably level serious critiques at our evermore sub-specializing field, but they would probably also be intrigued with our current desires for disciplinary “cohesion,” to invoke Walt Whitman, and interdisciplinary scholarship. For Emerson, “The American Scholar” is a person of action in the world. In this spirit, we’ll start by re-framing those first two provocations: not just what it might mean to be a major/minor or what you can do (modally inflected make-a-living verb) with a B.A. in English, but also what we do (philosophically, practically) as liberally educated people in the process. Thoreau might chime in, querying how this degree and this experience make us “live deliberately.” In this course, we will—to riff on the trees/ woods/living deliberately conceit that runs amuck across this course, and to paraphrase Sylvia Plath’s Esther Greenwood—talk about how to pick good figs for ourselves.

English 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation, and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate sub-fields of English Studies, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field.

ENGL 211 Editing and Publishing Practicum—The Pen Malphrus crn 25062

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times.

The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Come, join us!

ENGL 222 Creative Writing Across the Curriculum Malphrus crn 25065

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL B270 World Literature McCoy crn 25066

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. For ENGL majors, this course can substitute for ENGL 290. This course also counts toward the Gen. Ed. Non-Western Credit!

Literature from Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East are emphasized in this course alongside a historical and cultural narrative regarding the origins and ideas behind these texts.  Research papers and response essays constitute the bulk of assignments in this course, all of which also require students to engage in current issues and world historiography. We'll travel the world through literature!

THEA/ENGL 322 Playwriting Pate  crn 25089

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major [as elective] or minor. 

Playwriting- Writing plays is all about engagement. Engaging with actors. Directors. Designers. And, most importantly, with an audience. This class is a workshop, which means we'll also be engaging with fellow playwrights. You will regularly share your work with the class in a positive, collaborative atmosphere in which we try to discover what makes good plays tick. As you explore your voice as a playwright, you'll develop some ten-minute plays and even a complete one-act. This class also requires students to create submission packets and learn how to find opportunities to submit their work to theaters and other opportunities. Yes, you will walk out of this class with a deeper understanding of the elements of drama including character, dialogue, and plot, but hopefully you also leave with a fervor to create plays and the ambition and know-how to seek productions.

ENGL 386 Postmodernism Malphrus crn 25067

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800 or elective].

Postmodernism is a slippery, even slithery word that means different things to different people in different places at different times under different circumstances. In this class we’ll focus on the notion of literary postmodernism—when it began, when it ended (if it ended), what it is, what it isn’t, and most challenging of all—what to make of it. We’ll use the anthology Postmodern American Fiction and read several full-length works as well. The writers we will study (some briefly, others more in-depth) include John Barth, William S. Burroughs, Ursula Le Guin, Donald Barthelme, Ishmael Reed, Grace Paley, Tim O’Brien, Percival Everett, Don Delillo, Kurt Vonnegut, Margaret Atwood,  Alessandro Baricco, and John Gardner, all of whom needed, as Barth put it, “a little more narrative elbow room” than traditional “well-made” fiction afforded them.

ENGL 405 Early Shakespeare Kilgore crn 25068

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Pre-1800 or elective].

The Rhetorics of Power at Home and Abroad. Queen Elizabeth (reign 1558-1603) presented herself powerfully and theatrically, with rhetorics of dress, of speech,  of portraits, so it is no wonder she presided over a revolution in the English theater in the late 1580s and 1590s. Elizabeth’s England is a nation on the move, as she and her people renegotiated (with words, with violence) relationships both at home (the household, the nation) and abroad (war, trade, slave trading, and diplomacy). So too, at the center of many of the early plays of William Shakespeare and his contemporary and rival Christopher Marlowe are people who use words to get their way: to control, to flatter, to stigmatize, to deceive, to curse, et cetera. This reflects the period’s new-found fascination with the powers of rhetoric and eloquence; the drama is a form in which the words are not just read but spoken. Actors get to play kings, and say words in public. On stage, men wear women’s clothing; white Englishmen are performing in blackface. This course is an exploration of power, rhetoric, gender, and race in foreign and domestic spaces in the early plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare.

We’ll begin by thinking about these issues in the here and now: listening to Hamilton, and then by reading some sort pieces by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Roxane Gay and others. We’ll pay attention to a recent revolutionary charge in Shakespeare Studies, that is, a turn to critical race studies, especially as it informs the classroom teaching of Shakespeare. This framework will make more visible for us how English writers thought about race and gender in relationships foreign and domestic, and will focus our attention as we read plays of late 1850s and 90s. We’ll attend to “history plays” and their pyrotechnic language: Marlowe’s Tamburlaine the Great (1 and 2) and Shakespeare’s Richard III and Henry V. We will then turn the corner to “comedy,” through Black Panther (huh? wait for it!)to think about the implications of domestic and foreign rhetorics in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s DreamMuch Ado About Nothing, and The Merchant of  Venice. Discussion encouraged, short and long papers written. An attempt to imagine your own historical drama/musical about a historical figure will be done (pieces of this: you won’t need to write an entire musical for this course, never fear), and hopefully showcased to the broader public. Spirit of inquiry is essential.

Required materials: Lin-Manuel Miranda, Hamilton Original Broadway Cast RecordingBlack Panther film (Marvel / Disney). I’ve chosen the most economic paperback editions available for the Marlowe and Shakespeare (while internet texts abound, you will want to have the explanatory footnotes in a good, edited text; if you happen to have a massive Shakespeare edition with good notes, that will work, otherwise…) Marlowe, Four Plays: Tamburlaine, Parts One and Two, The Jew of Malta, Edward II and Dr. Faustus. New Mermaids/Bloomsbury Academic. ISBN: 9781408149492. $14.; and Shakespeare, Folger Shakespeare Library editions (all $6 each): Richard III. ISBN: 9780743482844; Henry V. ISBN: 9780743484879; A Midsummer Night’s Dream. ISBN: 9780743477543; Much Ado About Nothing. ISBN: 9780743482752; and The Merchant of Venice. ISBN: 9780743477567. Further materials on Blackboard.

ENGL 419 Topics in English Literature: Fantasy Literature Hoffer crn 26725

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800 or elective].

“There are other worlds than these…” ~Stephen King.
The publication of the first Harry Potter and Game of Thrones novels at the turn of the 21st century inaugurated what we might call a renaissance for fantasy fiction in popular culture. However, fantastical figures and realms have enlivened poetry and prose since antiquity! In this course, we will study major representative novels of the modern fantasy literary tradition—from the 19th to our own century—in order to explore the forms and techniques of the genre…in other words, the roots and inspirations for many of the stories we cherish (and obsess over!) today. Together, through an exploration of texts canonical and not (yet) canonical, we will identify the various structures, tropes, and themes that define this genre as well as the meaningful hijinks that occur when authors playfully depart from these paradigms.

We will inform our study of fantasy literature this fall by approaching our discussions through the lens of genre theory and with a particular focus on two definitive elements of the fantasy genre: “world-building” and “suspension of disbelief.” These foundational concepts will allow us to engage with other conventions of fantasy, such as metamorphosis, identity formation, the journey, the battle of good vs. evil, heroism, and more. Our readings will include works by Carroll, Lewis, Tolkien, LeGuin, Rowling, and others. Students will read and write critically and imaginatively, will strut their stuff on a final exam, and will present to the class on their favorite fantasy in an alternative medium—TV, film, comic, gaming, cosplay, etc.

English 422 American Literature, 1860–1910  Barnes  Crn 25052

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800 or elective].

Picture the Upper Bay, the harbor between the Atlantic Ocean and the Hudson River, the port of New York and New Jersey, our Eastern Seaboard starting point for mapping the field of U.S. Literature, 1860–1910. Imagine this storied spot in 1855 and in 1904, two distinct cultural moments, overlapping one another in your mind, if only for a minute. In 1855, Walt Whitman (world-renowned Brooklyn Bard, self-proclaimed “Son of Manhattan Island”) published the first edition of the poem that would become Song of Myself. Whitman, addressing us and turning west, wonders: “Have you reckoned a thousand acres much? Have you reckoned the earth much? / Have you practised so long to learn to read? / Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems?” As he draws us into this expansive lyric, he urges us to question how we read, how we know what we know, how we survey our place on this globe, and—implicitly and importantly—how we connect such seemingly sundry invocations.

In fact, Whitman himself avows elsewhere that “the United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.” Henry James writes along similar lines fifty years later, when his steamship lands just across the harbor. After living and writing abroad for over two decades (without having returned once), he arrived in Hoboken, overwhelmed by how much had changed in his country and in his mind. “My visit to America had been the first possible to me for nearly a quarter of a century,” James writes, “and I had before my last previous one, brief and distant to memory, spent other years in continuous absence; so that I was to return with much of the freshness of eye, outward and inward, which, with the further contribution of a state of desire, is commonly held a precious agent of perception.” The American Scene, published in 1904–1905, opens by looking “outward and inward,” inland and out-to-sea/over-the-pond all at once—and by connecting expatriation, even estrangement, to his refreshed sense of narrative perspective.

English 422 covers this fascinating period in U.S. literary history: from Walt Whitman to Henry James, from the years just before the Civil War to the years just before the First World War. We’ll begin our course by studying Henry David Thoreau’s “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” written about a moment that divided the nation and precipitated the Civil War: Harpers Ferry and its aftermath in the fall of 1859. In 1910, our stop-point, Wilbur and Orville Wright piloted their only flight together in Ohio and Glacier National Park was established in Montana. Between 1910 and 1911, our cultural gaze telescopes from the cosmic to the subatomic, from Halley’s comet to Ernest Rutherford’s gold foil experiment. Such watersheds remind us that this half-century is bookended by incredible innovations, but also by national and global fractures; at the same time, it’s known now for the rise of American Regionalism. We’ll study these capital-letter eras and terms: the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the Jim Crow Era, the Great American Poet, the International Novel, Regionalism, Realism, Naturalism, fin-de-siècle Aestheticism, and some Modernist inklings.

One way to approach this period has been to read the canon geopolitically, from North and South to World Power. Another has been to trace U.S. letters through cosmopolitanism or internationalism. We’ll think about the ways these texts invite us to hone reading practices that re-draw literary borderlines and literary margins. We’ll focus on representations of American lives that require us to think locally and globally at the same time. Interestingly, many of the most famous texts from this period have complex revision, publication, circulation, reception, and censorship histories that span several decades. In addition to focusing on the significance of place, then, we’ll also study what happens to literature itself during this tumultuous period—especially since such changes are bound to critical calls for reading regionally and transatlantically. Our course texts include Emily Dickinson ArchiveWalt Whitman ArchiveAlternative Alcott by Louisa May Alcott and edited by Elaine Showalter (9780813512723); The Awakening by Kate Chopin and edited by Margo Culley (ISBN: 9780393960570); The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James and edited by Geoffrey Moore (ISBN: 9780141439631); Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain and edited by John Seelye (ISBN: 9780140390469); Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman and edited by Michael Moon (ISBN: 9780393974966); American Women Regionalists edited by Judith Fetterley and Marjorie Pryse (ISBN: 9780393313635).

ENGL B439 (LBST B331) Selected Topics Cultural Historiography: The Cultural History of Hip Hop McCoy
ENGL B439 CRN 25060/LBST B331 CRN 25061

ENGL Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the ENGL major/minor as elective or toward the LBST major.

In 2017, for the first time since people began keeping track of music, hip-hop (and rap) surpassed rock and pop as the best-selling (and most streamed and most downloaded) music in the US. So let’s look back at hip-hop’s history to see how this genre of music came to be “everyone’s” music instead of underground phenomena.

We’ll start with the beats and up jump the boogie to late 70s/early 80s hip hop, where the message of songs reflected social, economic, political, and racial issues in the US. We’ll push it into the late 80s/early 90s, where hip-hop alternately encouraged people to fight the power – and we’ll see how much the powers that be have changed (or haven’t) since then. We’ll see how “goin’ back to Cali” and having a “New York state of mind” gave way to a violent bi-coastal rap battle, but also how “rags to riches” narratives – birthdays were the worst days/now we sip champagne when we’re thirsty – began to inform listeners of a new American dream. We’ll continue thinking of a master plan in terms of how women emerged as power players in hip hop (as well as how they were treated, especially in videos – not always ladies first) as well as look at how the SpottieOttieDopalicious world of Southern rap emerged, and how the hot sh*t of the Midwest got voice in the early 2000s. We’ll examine how the worst thing since Elvis Presley became the first rapper to win a Grammy – all of this and more (rhyme schemes, production methods, lyric topics, the fusion of rock & rap) is in store!

English B460 Professional Writing Workshop Swofford crn 25075

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as an elective and toward the Professional Writing Concentration. 

How do writers in professional spaces communicate effectively with a wide range of audiences? How can you use the writing skills you’ve developed in your coursework to write for readers beyond the classroom? How can writing benefit the public good? In this course, we will employ a user-centered, rhetorically-grounded approach to learn about how writers adapt their work for different audiences, genres, and purposes. We will learn a foundation of genre theory (part of rhetorical theory), and we will implement that theory as professional writers.

In order to practice these writing theories “in the real world,” you will have the opportunity to benefit your community as we explore how not-for-profit organizations use writing to raise funds for the cause, change hearts and minds, and motivate participation from real-world audiences. As a class, we will collaborate in (just like writers in professional settings) to create materials together for local organizations. We will first learn to examine the rhetorical situation of individual organizations to create a needs-based writing plan, then, depending on the organization, you may create rhetorically-savvy social media posts, blogs, grants proposals, press releases, position papers, fund-raising plans, reports, policy briefs, or other public relations documents. We will learn to analyze genre and audience as a means of most effectively assisting non-profits in accomplishing their missions. Along the way, we will discover and develop strategies using new media rhetorics, project and client management, and professional communication skills. Many professional writers work for large corporations, non-profits like the ones we’ll be assisting, policymakers, educational enterprises, and a range of other settings. This class will prepare you to do that work.

ENGL 461 Writing in the Health Professions Leaphart crn 25077 

 Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor , major, and professional writing concentration.

 Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 464 Poetry Workshop Malphrus  crn 25078 

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor as elective and toward either Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, can be taken twice for credit.

“A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance,” said James Dickey.  If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.  The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills.  In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world.  Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.  

LBST B297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods (Online) McCoy crn 25079

Looking for a course that allows for maximum exploration of your ideas and your aspirations but takes up a minimal amount of your time? Ready to blog? Thinking of taking a major in one discipline (like Biology) and a minor in another (like English) and wondering how they’ll work together? You’re invited to take LBST B297: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods! You’ll be blogging and thinking, all about what interests you and what you want to do! Come join us!

THEA 201 Introduction to Script Analysis Pate crn 25087

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. 

Script Analysis- Sure, script analysis is about applying the tools of literary analysis to plays, but it's so much more than that. It's asking how our interpretations of plays might manifest in performances. In set design. In costumes. In lighting. It's asking how the skills we learn from studying dramatic literature could be applied to help playwrights and theaters develop new works. It's about trying to tackle the infinitely complex question of what makes drama work as a mode of writing distinct from fiction, poetry, or any other mode or genre. It's about asking how the practical constraints of theatrical production influence dramatic writing and how dramatic writing's ignoring those constraints pushes the development of new means of theatrical production. It's about all of this, but at the core it's about tearing into plays to understand their guts.

THEA 430 Performing Shakespeare Ricardo crn 25084

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. 

 Performing Shakespeare- We often have images of Shakespearean actors as stiff and overly proper, but nothing could be further from the way Shakespeare was originally performed or the way his works are done by most theaters today. Shakespeare continues to be the world's most-produced playwright, and acting in his plays presents unique challenges and opportunities. By actually performing these works, you will better grasp what's going on with these characters and situations and learn that the language is not as impenetrable as it may seem. We'll explore ways to imbue Shakespeare plays with an energy drawn from your own creativity and experience. We will play off the texts, each other, and the world we live in. The skills explored in this class range from handling the verse to exploring how Shakespeare's plays shape and participate in our current discourse. Whether you're a budding actor, English scholar, teacher, or just someone with curiosity and a willingness to play, this is the class for you. 

 

Summer 2018 Courses  

LBST 260 Medical and Health Humanities (Full Term) Leaphart crn 73399

Have you ever thought about why health issues and medical topics are constantly popping up in the news? Or why the words complex and perplexing are most often associated with these stories? One part of the answer to these questions is that at the center of health and medicine is the human.  Come join LBST 260: Medical and Health Humanities as we take a dip into these waters.  We’ll look at how the humanities can be used to explore murky depths to reveal a better understanding of health and medicine, including but not limited to health disparities, health literacy, and cultural competencies.

This ONLINE class will use a variety of methods to engage students- including discussions of short videos, readings, and movies. The class is designed so that students have some flexibility with completing work and assignments in order to accommodate summer travel and work.  Whether you’re interested in health and medicine from a professional vantage or you are looking for an interesting and relevant class, this is a great fit for your summer! 

LBST B297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods (Online, Full Term) McCoy crn 73400

Looking for a summer course that allows for maximum exploration of your ideas and your aspirations but takes up a minimal amount of your time? Ready to blog? Thinking of taking a major in one discipline (like Biology) and a minor in another (like English) and wondering how they’ll work together? You’re invited to take LBST B297: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods! You’ll be blogging and thinking, all about what interests you and what you want to do! Come join us!

English 429 Abolition in the Sea Islands (Maymester) Barnes crn 73395

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800 or elective].

What can a celebrated actress from London, a determined schoolteacher from Philadelphia, and a now-infamous fugitive slave couple from Macon teach us about Abolitionism in the Sea Islands? How did a woman free herself and her husband by passing and cross-dressing all the way from Middle Georgia to Savannah, Charleston, and Philadelphia? What did life hold for them in Boston and—after the Fugitive Slave Law passed in 1850—in Liverpool? Why did they return to the lowcountry years later, hoping to build a farm and a school? How did England’s Shakespearean starlet—mid-century’s famed Juliet and Portia—become a different kind of transatlantic sensation? How did her divorce complicate/facilitate the publication of once-private journals: scathing critiques of plantation slavery?How did people fight for justice in the place we call home, just before and after emancipation?

Spend the first few weeks of summer learning about social reform networks in our own neck of the woods. We live in an extremely important place for nineteenth-century studies: a hotbed of secession and difficult reconstruction, yes, but also the sometime home to diverse abolitionist authors, educators, and activists. In this course, we’ll study a series of nineteenth-century texts with local composition, circulation, and reception histories. We’ll explore what people wrote about landmarks and watershed events that still punctuate our sense of place in Beaufort, Jasper, and Chatham Counties by reading powerful, painful, and inspiring books. We’ll also take advantage of our compressed summer schedule to do some in situ reading and researching that will help us study mid-century St. Helena and St. Simon’s Islands, Mitchelville and Woodville, Charleston and Savannah, Butler Plantation and Seaside Plantation. In fact, part of our work will require off-the-page/on-the-road time: touring the Penn Center, visiting the Camp Saxton marker and the William and Ellen Craft medallion at SCAD (just installed in February 2016).

I’m organizing our three weeks around three texts: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom by William and Ellen Craft (published 1860), Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation by Fanny Kemble (written, 1838–1839; published 1863); and Charlotte Forten Grimké’s Journals and essays about the Port Royal Experiment and the Penn School (written, 1861–1864; published 1953). To contextualize this focused reading sequence, we’ll also study short passages by writers whose deep-rooted, sprawling abolitionist networks challenge us to engage seriously with current debates in American Studies about precarious historical and geopolitical boundaries. We’ll place our writers in serious conversation with Laura Towne, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry David Thoreau, and Angelina and Sarah Grimké—and map important triangulations that link the lowcountry to Boston, Concord, and Philadelphia. By stressing the presence of the lowcountry in narratives by authors who emigrated or were displaced as fugitives, we’ll learn to read abolitionist transformations regionally and nationally at the same time. As we’ll discover, our most local, coastal texts also require us to read transatlantically. In this spirit, our culminating writing project will link our university to our broader community. Students will create multimodal annotations/editions of excerpted passages as alternatives to traditional, researched close reading essays. Our goal is to make projects that enrich (maybe recast, maybe unnerve) people’s perspectives of our most immediate worlds.

English 439 Language and Identity in the South (Full Term) Swofford crn 73432

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor as an elective.

What relationship does a language have with the people who speak it? How do our languages shape our relationships with one another? How is our language connected to our sense of who we are? Why do people use a “southern accent” to show a character on television or in the movies is unintelligent? What is a “southern belle” and why do we call them that? What is the history of language in the Southeast (and here in the Lowcountry of South Carolina in particular)? In this class, we will explore the gnarly and complex relationship between language, rhetoric, and identity here in the South.

We will discover the various dialects, creoles, and languages that speakers in the South use to communicate, and we’ll think together about how those languages shape the identities we form and the ways we encounter one another. This means that we will be learning all about the different kinds of “Southern American English” that we encounter every day here in Beaufort County, but we will also be confronting the representations of “Southern English” we see in television, the movies, and other forms of media.

The course will begin with an introduction to English language linguistics. We will use this understanding and the foundation of sociolinguistic research and theory to discover how our language works, and how our beliefs and attitudes about language have the power to change our relationships with the people around us. Along the way, we will conduct sociolinguistic research of our own and write about how understanding language helps us understand ourselves and the people around us. As a class, we will create a Southern English grammar, and you will get to conduct interviews with local speakers. By the end of this course, you will have a framework for understanding how the various forms of Southern English work, and you will better understand the role of language in our everyday lives. 

 

Spring 2018 Courses 

English 211-001: Editing & Publishing Practicum: The Pen—  Malphrus

 co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." ~Benjamin Franklin

The Pen, a publication of the USCB Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative works, evaluate submissions, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself.

English 211-002: Editing & Publishing Practicum: May River Review – Barnes & Hoffer

co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times

 Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts)

English 222: Creative Writing Across the Curriculum—Malphrus

 Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective

"Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go."    ~E.L. Doctorow

 Ready to explore? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words. 

English 287: American Literature Survey—Barnes

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

 What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2018? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 288: English Literature I –Galloway Holmes.

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language.  Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton's Paradise Lost.   We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe.  As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English.   As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of "what does it mean to be human?"  We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility.  Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur's court.  The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2).

English 289 English Literature II—Hoffer

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. You don't need to take English Literature I before II.

Pasts, Presents, Futures. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. Our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) and one contemporary British novel of your choice from a list of selections.

ENGL 301/THEA 301: Theater History IPate

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 401 Chaucer: Medieval Romance, Disney, and Representation [UPDATED]—Kilgore

 Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor [Pre-1800]. Works for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Film Studies.

American popular culture has a long, sometimes frivolous, and often troubling, attachment to aspects of Geoffrey Chaucer’s work, courtly love, and European medieval culture more broadly, and this is represented in part in the films and parks of Disney. The castles, the princesses, and the structure of stories that echo those of the medieval romance (roman = story) of knights and ladies: the world that falls apart and gets put back together. We’ll explore Chaucer, related medieval texts, and Disney films (my lists are still evolving as the genre is evolving, see below) and scholarship and journalism about both. Discussion encouraged, papers written, public-facing project done. Spirit of inquiry is essential.

Our method for the course will be, while we explore the genre and structure of Chaucer’s works and medieval literary romance, to attend to the representations of masculinity, femininity, queer identity, race, and nationhood in these texts and films—while exploring the representations of the medieval in our times (that is, the medievalisms). Some questions to pursue: Who is represented in these texts/films? What does it mean (what good is it) to read medieval tales that include sexual assault and maltreatment of non-Christian others in 2018? In what ways has Disney’s treatment of the medieval been salutary? liberating? anodyne? destructive? fun? In what ways is Moana a knight? In what ways did Walt Disney want to be King Arthur, and make Walt Disney World / “the Florida Project” to be Camelot all over again? Should I take my son to Disney for a knight makeover to inspire his pursuit of virtue, or would I be setting him up with either a) impossible expectations, or b) an unhealthy understanding of gender? In what ways is romance reality? In what ways is this material effectively taught to high school students?

Required texts: The Norton Anthology of English Literature, 9th ed., Volume A (9780393912494); Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (Norton, 9780393925876) and Troilus and Criseyde (Norton, 9780393927559) GET THESE EDITIONS; further materials on Blackboard. The films I want you to watch in full will be on Library reserve. Tentative reading/watching list: Selections from The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, some poetry by Marie de France, and pieces of Malory’s Death of Arthur. And we’ll also screen all or part of Snow White (1937), Cinderella (1950), The Sword in the Stone (1963), Robin Hood (1973), A Knight in Camelot (1998, live action, starring Whoopi Goldberg), A Knight’s Tale (2001, Heath Ledger), Moana (2016), The Florida Project (2017), and yes, some of the Star Wars oeuvre. (And I’m open to suggestions.) The Medieval POC Tumblr. YouTube videos of rides at Disney parks. For more details, email me at kilgorer [at] uscb.edu.

English 428: African American Literature Seminar—Barnes

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. [Post-1800]

 "Perhaps, as we say in America, I wanted to find myself. This is an interesting phrase, not current as far as I know in the language of any other people, which certainly does not mean what it says but betrays a nagging suspicion that something has been misplaced. I think now that if I had had any intimation that the self I was going to find would turn out to be only the same self from which I had spent so much time in flight, I would have stayed at home. But, again, I think I knew, at the very bottom of my heart, exactly what I was doing when I took the boat for France."—James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room

We'll spend our time this spring studying works by and/or about African American expatriates. Far from even attempting to cover breadth in this seminar, we'll focus our reading on a range of texts that take belonging as their subject. We'll explore letters, poems, novels, travelogues, autobiographies, short stories, and works dubbed as "avant-garde" for the ways that they defy these generic boundaries/categories. In fact, our course texts represent expatriation as an act that variously promises personal and political liberation; collective isolation; creative resistance and restoration; historic empowerment; artistic experimentation; love of one's self and of one's country, and the unflinching criticism necessary for both of those last two things. Our texts map generations of soul-searching types whose narratives of life in Denmark and Cuba, in Northern Ireland and the South of France, in Naples and (of course!) Paris, reflect complex states of expatriation—sometimes ebbing from insistent hope to disorientation/displacement, from homesickness to wanderlustful joy in just a handful of pages. We'll wonder over why certain places became so important to so many artists at certain cultural moments—and how these patterns abroad affect the ways critics popularize and canonize African American literature in different periods. We'll read beautiful books (some you'll surely reach for as favorites long after our course is over: Quicksand by Nella Larsen! Giovanni's Room by James Baldwin!). But to do this well, we'll also listen to music and look at drawings, paintings, and other visual arts. Our reading list is a work in progress. It will encompass a range of nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers. I'm considering some pieces and some full-length works by Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Anna Julia Cooper, Langston Hughes, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Gwendolyn Bennett, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Nina Simone, Angela Davis, and Andrea Lee. I'm happy to collect requests and suggestions from interested students!

ENGL B439/LBST B331: Social Justice & the Chinese Cultural Revolution (3)—McCoy

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor.What does social justice look like in the middle of a cultural revolution? What does the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges look like in Communist China?To find out, we're going to learn a little about Chinese history. We'll read a comprehensive (epic!) biography on the legendary Chairman Mao, and we'll look at contemporary Chinese art – dissenting and non – and try to wrap our heads about our mystical and mammoth neighbor to the East! Come check out China this spring!

ENGL 442: Principles of Modern Literary Theory—Once Upon a Theory—Hoffer

Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor. Meets the major's literary theory requirement.

Theory is often described as a lens: a distinct set of terms and ideas that, when "put on" like a pair of glasses, enables a different way of seeing and understanding the world—or, when it comes to literary theory, a different way of seeing and understanding texts.  Theory has a long history reaching all the way back to antiquity, but the 20th century was what many consider the heyday of literary theory as one after another "school" emerged and transformed the way scholars think about literature and culture. In this course, we will try on many different lenses as we study the development and nature of several major modern theories.  The course has two principal goals:  1.) to expose you to a number of critical theories through a study of the terminology, concepts, and primary texts by the theorists who helped to define those perspectives, and 2.) to enable you to use these theories in order to formulate your own interpretive arguments about texts. The focus of our theoretical applications for in-class discussion and writing assignments —the playground upon which we will enact these theoretical principles—will be the fairy tale tradition. Through our examination of classic folklore and fairy tales as well as their contemporary adaptations (many of these revisions shaped by the very theories we will encounter), we will practice using theory to create literary criticism. We will investigate the types of readings available through each theoretical perspective; explore how different theories can be applied to a single text to allow for a rich diversity of meaning; and discover the ways that theories can be blended together to form still further innovations in interpretation.  Required texts: Critical Theory Today, 3rd ed.(ISBN 9780415506755), Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies (ISBN 9780199797776 ) and The Classic Fairy Tales (ISBN 9780393972771).

English 462: Technical Writing—Duffy

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred. Open to students from any major. 

ENGL470: Teaching of Writing—Swofford

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher—or consent of instructor. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

What does "good" writing instruction look like? Can we really teach writing? How can we know if our own writing is "good"? In this class, we'll examine these questions, among others, as we consider the methods for teaching writing to students at a variety of levels. This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in K-12 classrooms, university classrooms, and writing centers. We are going to read about the "best practices" of teaching writing, watch experienced teachers guide student writers, and try out the things we've read and seen as we teach writing ourselves. In other words, the goal of this course is to provide students with both a strong theoretical foundation in writing pedagogy and the first-hand experience to put that theory into practice. Recommended for prospective K-12 and university writing teachers, writing center tutors, and English majors. Students who pass this course with a B or higher are eligible to apply to be paid tutors in the Writing Center.

ENGL472: Cinema – McQuillen

Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher—or consent of instructor. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and majorProbe the depths of some of cinema's most influential and thought-provoking films!

Cinema will provide students with an in-depth and focused study of 4 to 5 films from select genres and directors. Students will increase their film vocabulary with explorations in genre study and core concepts in popular film theories, such as auteur and feminist film theory. We will discuss the likes of Laura Mulvey, Roger Ebert, Susan Sontag, Andre Bazin, and Sergei Eisenstein. We will sift through a variety of articles dealing and discussing our films and see if they take us down a road of enlightenment or into a land of confusion. We plan to ask some hard questions about films and about our own interpretations of these films. Let's challenge each other, including myself, to find out what these films are trying to say. Is Ridley Scott's Alien really about the perversion of sex and birth or nothing more than a haunted house in space movie? Let's really sink our teeth into it! Students will write traditional essays and participate in group presentations based on genre and theory readings to lead class discussions. We will watch films and then watch scenes from those select films two or three times.

LBST B297: Interdisciplinary Research Methods (3)—McCoy

Open to Liberal Studies majors & interdisciplinary minors. Online. Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST B351: Beyond the Classroom Community Project I (3)—McCoy

Open to all majors at all levels. Online.

Do you want to do some "service learning" but be more of the inventor than the participant? Seniors! Want to graduate with a bang and leave your mark on USCB? Other-classmen! Want to create a project idea that you could implement in the fall? TAKE THIS CLASS!

"Beyond the Classroom I" requires you, the student, to design a community project, individually or in a small group. The project must respond to a community need, involve participants in reciprocal activities, provide opportunities for student's on-going reflection, and evaluate the activity.  Explore the opportunities, strategies, successes and pitfalls of service learning in higher education from a theoretical perspective.  In Fall 2018, you'll have the opportunity to apply these ideas toward your own service learning project proposal, in LBST B352.

LBST B331/ENGL B439: Social Justice & the Chinese Cultural Revolution (3)—McCoy

What does social justice look like in the middle of a cultural revolution? What does the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges look like in Communist China?

To find out, we're going to learn a little about Chinese history. We'll read a comprehensive (epic!) biography on the legendary Chairman Mao, and we'll look at contemporary Chinese art – dissenting and non – and try to wrap our heads about our mystical and mammoth neighbor to the East! Come check out China this spring!

LBST B497: Seminar in the Liberal Studies Among the Disciplines (2)—McCoy

 Senior standing Liberal Studies majors thesis course.

THEA 170: Fundamentals of Acting—Ricardo

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

Fundamentals of Acting will serve as an introduction to acting methodology and practice.  Through exploration of the instrument, namely our bodies, and its communicative potential, we will examine the possibility of voice and movement in culmination with thought and feeling.  We will explore creation and implementation through games, exercises and critical analysis, and our endeavors will ultimately come to fruition through the final scene. The goal of this class is to cultivate the basic imaginative, physical and vocal skills necessary for acting. Through this work, the hope is to sharpen the student's observational skills toward life, so that he or she may channel this into artistic sensibility. Most importantly, this class will stress the importance of play.  The goal of this course is not necessarily to train students to become great actors, but to use the actor's tools to improve skills in communication, analysis, and critical thinking.

THEA 200: Understanding and Appreciation of Theater—Pate

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We'll look at Western theater's roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater's place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 301 / ENGL 301: Theater History I—Pate

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor

Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

THEA 370: Intermediate Acting—Ricardo

Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Intermediate Acting will expand upon the skills and techniques learned in Fundamentals of Acting.  The goal of this class is to move beyond the basic imaginative, physical, and vocal skills necessary for acting and toward a more complete mastery of characterization.  Working together, as an ensemble, students will endeavor to create new works throughout the course of the semester.  This class will be run more along the lines of a conservatory model.  Attendance and participation are imperative for the success of the ensemble. 

 

Fall 2017 Courses

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 200, 211, 222, 270, 289, 302, and 461.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 270 are only offered in Fall semesters. Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters. 287 and 288 will be offered in Spring 2018.

ENGL 180: Introduction to Film - McQuillen

Prereq: ENGL 101 with a grade of C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and for the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

“Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls.” ― Ingmar Bergman

“It's not what a movie is about, it's how it is about it.”  ― Roger Ebert

From Orson Welles’ groundbreaking Citizen Kane to Christopher Nolan’s mind-blowing Inception, film has a way to excite, entertain, and provoke like few visual mediums can. ENGL 180 is a general film appreciation class. It will introduce you to the basics of film production, narrative, style, editing, performance, sound, theory, and analysis, among other things. It will also expose you to a variety of films produced in the U. S. and other countries from the very beginnings of the medium in the 1890s, through the "Golden Age" of Hollywood in the 1930s-50s, and up to the present. So, be ready for a mix of classics and contemporary films, not just recent blockbusters. We will be viewing a wide range of films to see how they function as commercial / entertainment / artistic artifacts. This entails examining how we might place them within certain historical / cultural perspectives, and why certain ways of seeing films might be more or less important to us as viewers. By the end of the semester you will become adept at viewing films with an eye toward how they affect you as a person. This will also be a crucial class if you pursue the film minor.

ENGL 200: Introduction to English Studies - Barnes

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor.

“I saw my life branching out before me like the green fig tree in the story. From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, and another fig was Ee Gee, the amazing editor, and another fig was Europe and Africa and South America, and another fig was Constantin and Socrates and Attila and a pack of other lovers with queer names and offbeat professions, and another fig was an Olympic lady crew champion, and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn’t quite make out.” —Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (1963)

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.” —Henry David Thoreau, Walden (1854)

What does it mean to be an English major or an English minor? What can you do with this program of study? My favorite writers—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller—might hear Transcendentalist echoes reverberating in these questions and in the answers academics tend to pose nowadays. These Concordians would probably level serious critiques at our evermore sub-specializing field, but they would probably also be intrigued with our current desires for disciplinary “cohesion,” to invoke Walt Whitman, and interdisciplinary scholarship. For Emerson, “The American Scholar” is a person of action in the world. In this spirit, we’ll start by re-framing those first two provocations: not just what it might mean to be a major/minor or what you can do (modally inflected make-a-living verb) with a B.A. in English, but also what we do (philosophically, practically) as liberally educated people in the process. Thoreau might chime in, querying how this degree and this experience make us “live deliberately.” In this course, we will—to riff on the trees/woods/living deliberately conceit that runs amuck across this course, and to paraphrase Sylvia Plath’s Esther Greenwood—talk about how to pick good figs for ourselves.

English 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation, and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate sub-fields of English Studies, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field.

ENGL 211.01: Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 1 - The May River Review - Hoffer & Barnes

Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts). Open to students from any major.

Section 2 - The Pen - Malphrus                       

The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 215: Writing Center Practicum - Swofford

Pre-req: Instructor permission; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in university writing centers (specifically, the writing center here at USCB). We are going to read about the “best practices” of teaching writing, observe one another as we tutor student writers, reflect on our own tutoring, and set goals for improving our tutoring practices. Students will collaborate to find solutions for common problems in tutoring sessions, hone their skills to best meet the needs of specific student populations, and work to promote writing across campus at USCB.  (Intended for current Writing Center tutors)

ENGL 222: Creative Writing Across the Curriculum - Malphrus

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective. 

English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words. 

ENGL 270: World Literature - McCoy

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. For ENGL majors, this course can substitute for ENGL 290.

 I am not born for one corner, the whole world is my native land. — Seneca

Travel the world without leaving the comforts of USCB in World Literature this fall! Spanning nearly every corner of the globe, this course emphasizes the study of texts and critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms since 1700. Globetrot your way through the Enlightenment, Realism, Modernism, and Post-War/Post-Colonial eras while thinking about different cultures and ways of approaching life through literature. Authors from France, Italy, Russia, Germany, Spain, Denmark, Norway, India, United States, England, China, Japan, Argentina, Senegal, Romania, and Iran encourage us to engage in our world through unfamiliar and exotic eyes. We will be considering a variety of literary forms: poetry, short stories, plays, novels, and graphic novels. We will focus on ideas of representation (character, setting, and historical context) as well as how to approach cultural difference. Open to all majors.

ENGL 289: English Literature II - Hoffer

 Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a prerequisite for the English major/minor. You don't need to take English Literature I before II.

Pasts, Presents, Futures. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. Our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) and one contemporary British novel of your choice from a list of selections.

ENGL/THEA 302: Theater History II - Pate

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor. You don't need to take Theater History I before II.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

ENGL 402: Tudor Literature - Kilgore

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

Writing the Queen. In 1588, Queen Elizabeth, leading her troops into battle against the Spaniards, conceded she had “the body but of a weak and feeble woman,” but insisted she had “the heart and stomach of a king, and a king of England too.” If the Renaissance is an international movement of arts and letters, then the flowering of arts of letters in England under Elizabeth is a nationalistic enterprise. It also is gendered. The virgin queen, Elizabeth, is the author, monarch, subject, or object of much of the writing we’ll read, leading to the bizarre circumstance that poems about shepherds singing to shepherdesses are very often poems about domestic and foreign policy. But they’re also really good poems.  

In this course, you’ll become familiar with the major non-dramatic genres and modes of Renaissance literature: treatise, lyric, pastoral, romance, and epic. You’ll sample from a variety of important sixteenth century prose writings (including Machiavelli, Castiglione, and Tyndale), and then focus on the poetry of Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, Philip and Mary Sidney, and Aemilia Lanyer — all of which have Queen Elizabeth inspiring and haunting their pages. We’ll also read the poetry of Elizabeth herself and the love letters her dad (Henry VIII) wrote to her mom (Anne Boleyn). Longer readings include Book One of Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Philip Sidney’s Astrophil and Stella, Marlowe’s translation of Ovid’s Elegies, Lanyer’s Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum (don’t worry, it’s in English), but even these longer readings are relatively short: we’ll need to read them carefully.  Attendance mandatory, discussion encouraged, presentations given, frequent writing designed to lead to a researched argumentative essay of 9-10 pages, final exam, sense of humor, and spirit of inquiry essential.  

Required texts with ISBNs: Sir Philip Sidney: The Major Works (Oxford UP, 2002, 9780199538416); Christopher Marlowe, The Complete Poems and Translations (Penguin, 2007, 9780143104957); Edmund Spenser’s Poetry (Norton, 1992, 9780393962994); Renaissance Women Poets (Penguin, 2001, 9780140424096); Elizabeth I and Her Age, edited by Felch and Stump (Norton, 2008, 9780393928228). Online texts are inadequate substitutes for the required texts. For more details, email me at kilgorer [at] uscb.edu.

ENGL 415: The English Novel - Hoffer 

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

Novel Identities. For over two centuries, the novel has arguably been the most popular form of literature. This was not, however, always the case. Where did the novel come from, and what various shapes has it taken since its inception? How did it achieve the level of predominance it has today? Many scholars have proposed that the rise of the novel is tied to evolving conceptions of the individual and his/her place in the world (socially, psychologically, etc.) and argue that the novel has unique means for portraying and constructing this complex subject, even beyond the page. In this course, we will investigate this hypothesis by taking as our focus a group of novels—each named after its principal character—that pays special attention to the tribulations and triumphs of these eponymous characters. Each representing a different subgenre of the novel, these texts will allow us to trace the evolution of the form from the 18th through the early 20th centuries and to examine the various ways the individual is depicted and defined. Special attention will be paid to elements of form and genre, especially point of view, and to cultural conceptions of identity, particularly as they pertain to individualism, class, and gender.

ENGL 425B: American Novel Since 1914 - Malphrus

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

SURVIVAL: The beginning of World War I has been a traditional literary place mark, and here we are 100 years later looking back on the struggles and triumphs of our nation as revealed in the texts of our time – and the time of our forbears for the last generations. Of the myriad ways in which we could view such a wide swath of literary output, this course will focus through the thematic lens of survival (in its many nuances). Our primary texts will be Ernest Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms—“the classic novel of love during wartime”; The Color Purple by Alice Walker—Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award Winner;  It Can’t Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis—“an alarming, eerily timeless look at how fascism could take hold in America” (published in 1935); The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon—“an American epic of two boy geniuses”;  As I Lay Dying,” by William Faulkner—which “ranges in mood from dark comedy to deep pathos”; and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest by Ken Kesey—whose protagonist Randle Patrick McMurphy is “a boisterous, brawling, fun-loving rebel who swaggers into the world of a mental hospital and takes over.”

ENGL 429: Topics in American Lit: Historical Imaginaries - Barnes

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote that “[a]ll history becomes subjective.” For Emerson, History with a capital H exists in each person’s present-tense imagination, not as objective fact. “Every mind,” he writes, “must know the whole lesson for itself—must go over the whole ground. What it does not see, what it does not live, it will not know. What the former age has epitomized into a formula or rule for manipular convenience, it will lose all the good of verifying for itself, by means of the wall of that rule. Somewhere, sometime, it will demand and find compensation for that loss, by doing the work itself.” In his biography of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James muses along similar lines that “it takes a great deal of history to produce a little literature.” We’ll grapple with these big-picture ideas throughout this course by studying cultural memory as we encounter it in historical literature: at two removes. All of the texts that we’ll read dramatize earlier historical moments in America’s past. We’ll discuss these texts as works of art, but we’ll also study the periods when they were published and set. Our project will be to trace the complex historical imaginaries that unfold in American letters across what many critics now call “the long nineteenth century.”

We’ll devote most of our time to novels: Susanna Rowson’s Reuben and Rachel; or, A Tale of Old Times (published in 1798; the history of a family, one branch of Christopher Columbus’s tree, over ten generations) or Catharine Sedgwick’s Hope Leslie (published in 1827; set in 1643); Nathaniel Hawthorne’s, The Scarlet Letter (published in 1850; set between 1642 and 1649); Frances Ellen Watkins Harper’s, Iola Leroy; or, Shadows Uplifted (published in 1892; set during and immediately after the Civil War); Toni Morrison’s Beloved (published in 1987; set after the Civil War); Edith Wharton’s, The Age of Innocence (published 1920; set circa 1870s–1880s); and Edward Bellamy’s Looking Backward: 2000–1887 (published in 1888; set in 2000). We’ll ground our studies in local literary history with chapters from what many dub the Gone with the Wind of Beaufort: Francis Griswold’s A Sea Island Lady (published in 1939; set in the Lowcountry between the Civil War and the Second World War). We’ll contextualize this sequence with poems, short stories, and excerpts from one of the most famous historical fiction series (James Fenimore Cooper’s Leatherstocking Tales) that take memory as their subject. Here are some of the other poets and texts we’ll likely cover: Emma Lazarus, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and Adrienne Rich; Washington Irving’s, “Rip Van Winkle” (published in 1819; set before and immediately after the Revolutionary War) and Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s, “A Reminiscence of Federalism” (published in 1835; set in the 1790s).

 *An alternative topics course on feminism and joy in American literature is percolating. Please contact me if that sounds like your cup of tea. If there is serious student interest, I’d love to write and run this course instead. :D

ENGL 453: Development of the English Language -  Swofford

Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent.

History and Development of English: We hear many complaints that “texting is ruining the English language.” Such complaints are not new. In 1387, Ranulph Higden fretted about the influence of the Danes and Normans on English and the ways their “chattering” brought bad habits into the language. It’s clear that English has always been changing, and has, in fact, changed dramatically enough that we as Modern English speakers can barely understand those who first began to call their language “English” and created written records of poems such as Beowulf. In this course, we will do a broad sweep of the English language’s history, focusing on the changes in the structure of the language, but also the stories of the cultures and speakers who make it such a rich and fascinating subject. The course will balance attention to the technicalities of historical linguistic developments and serious engagement with theories of language diversity and change—including how “standard language” and “grammar instruction” developed in the history of English and how language ideologies shape the history we tell. Languages are inextricably connected to the people who speak them, so we’ll be discussing attitudes about dialects (especially local dialects/languages like Southern English, African-American English, and Gullah), and we’ll work through tricky questions about how all of this knowledge should affect the ways that we teach and learn English and English/Language Arts.

Along the way, we will also address a variety of intriguing linguistic questions such as: Where did the pronoun she come from? (And why is it the Word of the Millennium?) When did double negation become non-standard, and who first said (erroneously) that two negatives make a positive? Why is colonel spelled the way it is and yet pronounced “kernel”? How did English spelling become, according to linguist Mario Pei, the “world’s most awesome mess”? Why and how do “living” languages change? Bring a genuine curiosity about the details of language and how language changes, and a willingness to dig into the messy business of understanding how the English language came to be.

ENGL 461: Writing in the Health Professions - Kilgore

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 464: Poetry Workshop - Malphrus

Pre-req: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, can be taken twice for credit.

"A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance," said James Dickey. If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.

The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.

ENGL 466: Writing Internship - Various

Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, contact Dr. Kilgore or Dr. Swofford.

THEA 170: Fundamentals of Acting - Ricardo

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

You don’t have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 200: Understanding and Appreciation of Theater - Pate

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We’ll look at Western theater’s roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater’s place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 201: Intro to Script Analysis - Ricardo

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Is it a literature class? Or is it a theater class? Yes! In this class, we’ll read several plays and discuss techniques for analyzing them to pull out such elements as tone, character, and theme, much as you would do for any close reading work in a literature class. However, our analysis will maintain a specialized focus on applications for performance. In other words, we’ll constantly ask how our close readings might be useful to an actor, a director, or a set or costume designer. We’ll also learn how to do historical and critical research to learn about a play’s production history and the discourse it has provoked. Our writing assignments will focus on how to communicate our analysis and research in the way that will be most accessible and useful to varying audiences including theater practitioners and theater patrons.

THEA 220: Theater Laboratory - Pate

Pre-req: Instructor permission. 1 credit course. Supervised participation in theatre production. No formal class meetings. May be repeated for up to 8 credits.

THEA/ENGL 302: Theater History II - Pate

Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship - McCoy

Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods - McCoy

Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 397: Readings in Philosophy - McCoy

For ENGL majors, this course will satisfy the program requirement for a PHIL course.

 

“Never be afraid to raise your voice for honesty and truth and compassion against injustice and lying and greed.” - William Faulkner

This course will examine key texts and ideas that form a variety of ideologies regarding social protest. We will study social protest from a mostly American perspective, but recognition and assessment of global instances of protest will be included and encouraged. The motivations behind social protest, particularly those related to anti-war protests in American history, will be a large focus of this course, but a comprehensive look at civil disobedience will be included. Current social movements may be assessed as comparative instances of protest in conjunction with our historical and philosophical survey of social protests throughout the US and beyond.

BOOKS: We Who Dared to Say No to War (Polner & Woods, 2008; ISBN: 1568583850); The Art of Moral Protest: Culture, Biography and Creativity in Social Movements  (Jasper, 1997-9; ISBN: 0226394816).

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines - McCoy

Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Summer 2017 Courses English Courses

ENGL 439: Selected Topics - Fantasy Literature - Hoffer

Full Summer Term 2017

“There are other worlds than these…” - Stephen King, The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger

The publication of the first Harry Potter and Game of Thrones novels at the turn of the 21st century inaugurated a renaissance for fantasy literature in popular culture. However, fantastical figures and realms have enlivened fiction since antiquity! In this course, we will study major representative texts of the fantasy literary tradition in order to explore the forms and techniques of the genre—in other words, the roots and inspirations for many of the stories we cherish (and obsess over!) today. Together, we will identify the various structures, tropes, and themes that characterize this canon as well as what happens when authors depart from these paradigms.

We will take as our focus two of the central tenets of fantasy literature: the concepts of “world-building” and “suspension of disbelief.” These broad principles will allow us to engage with other matters common to fantasy fiction, such as metamorphosis, identity formation, the journey, the battle of good vs. evil, heroism, and more. Our readings will include works by Carroll, Baum, Lewis, Tolkien, LeGuin, Rowling, and others. Students will have the opportunity to vote on the 21st c. text we will study in the last week of the term as well as to present on their favorite fantasy in an alternative medium—TV, film, comic, gaming, cosplay, etc.

ENGL 439 counts as a POST-1800 or English Elective toward the major or minor, and can be taken multiple times under different course titles. It may also fulfill Humanities or Liberal Arts general education requirements. Students from all majors are welcome! Prerequisites: one ENGL course at the 200-level OR instructor permission. This is a 10-week USCB summer term course, meaning we will meet once a week from May 31st-July 28th. Class will meet on Wednesdays from 1:00-4:30pm (with breaks). Feel free to contact Dr. Hoffer at Hoffer [at] uscb.edu with any questions or for information on financial aid!

ENGL 463: Business Writing - Duffy

Full Summer Term 2017

This course is designed to introduce students to strategies and techniques they can use to write functional, useful documents in business. The goals of the course are to develop those communication and writing skills for efficacy in the workplace. As no single strategy or formula can be used in all occasions or at all times, audience analysis, critical thinking, and investigation of rhetorical situations will be important for devising methods for building situational responses. Students will learn to be flexible with style and content within the somewhat strict forms of professional communication. Students will conduct library research and learn to use it persuasively and argumentatively in group and individual projects, generating professional quality information in letter and memo (correspondence), and technical report formats. 

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship - McCoy

Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods - McCoy

Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines - McCoy

Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Spring 2017 Courses

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Open to students from any major. Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

  • Section 001: The Pen Practicum
    Malphrus—Tu 1:40–2:55; crn 51440
    The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. Open to students from any major.
  • Section 002: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
    Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40-2:55 crn 51441
    Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

  • Malphrus—MW 12:30–1:45 crn 51443.
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

    "Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people." 
    — Leo Burnett

    Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 287 - American Literature

  • Barnes—TTH 4:30-5:45 crn 51444
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2017? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 288 - English Literature I

  • Galloway—MW 10:30-11:20 crn 51449
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language. Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton's Paradise Lost. We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe. As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English. As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of "what does it mean to be human?" We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility. Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur's court. The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

  • Hoffer—TTH 3:05-4:20; crn 51438 
    You don't need to take English Literature I before II. Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

    ENGL 289 offers you a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In spring 2017, our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as "literary history," "tradition," "convention," "canon," and "period." We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology and encounter major literary and cultural movements—Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required texts are as follows: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335), H.G. Well's The Time Machine (ISBN 9780743487733), and Kazuo Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go (ISBN 9781400078776). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 301 / THEA 301 - Theater History I

  • Pate—MWF 11:30-12:20 crn 53929 
    Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the English major or minor, or for the Theater minor.

    Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 411 - British Romantic Literature

  • "We see into the life of things": Green Romanticism
    Hoffer—TTH 12:15-1:30 crn 53931
     
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    GREEN ROMANTICISM is an approach to the literature and culture of the Romantic era (circa 1770-1830) that investigates the nature of Romantic writers' engagement with nature and attempts to trace their impact on the ways we think about our environment today. "Green Romanticism" or "Romantic Ecology" takes as its starting point the Romantics' fascination with and connection to the natural world—their love of the land and its fruits, material and spiritual— and explores this investment in terms of the development not only of their aesthetic but of ecological, conservational, and environmental discourses from the late eighteenth-century to the present.

    In this course, our core objectives are two-fold. First, we will study Romantic poetry and prose through close, critical engagement with the period's major writers and texts as well as examine the cultural concerns that informed this literature. Second, we will discover the terminology and models of inquiry evoked by the literary theory known as ECOCRITICISM. This "study of the relationship between literature and the physical environment" encourages students to pose such questions as "How is the natural world, flora and fauna, represented in this poem? What role do landscapes—as literary "setting" but also in terms of the very concept of place—play in this novel? Are the values expressed in this text consistent with ecological wisdom? What interchange is possible between literary and environmental discourse? By studying canonical writers such as Blake, the Wordsworths, Coleridge, Byron, both the Shelleys, Keats, and Austen alongside less familiar poets such as Clare, Barbauld, Burns, and Smith through the critical lens of ecocriticism, we will find ourselves able to engage in new ways not only with the world as the Romantics knew it but with our own as well.

    Students in ENGL 411 will have the option to compose a traditional research paper OR to construct their own "Go Green" sustainability or environmental advocacy project for their final writing assignment. The books required for this course are: Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (978-0-393-92793-1), Jane Austen's Mansfield Park (978-0-393-96791-3), The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume D: The Romantic Period, 9th edition (ISBN 9780393912524), and Romanticism: A Very Short Introduction (ISBN 978-0199568918).

ENGL 421 - American Literature, 1830-1860

  • Barnes—MW 4:45–6:00 crn 53933
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    The pages of Romantic and Renaissance Americana are populated with fascinating, sometimes even baffling, figures: a prophetic raven; a poetic selfie; a transparent eyeball; a resistant legal scribe; a barbaric yawper; a loquacious revolutionary; a self-isolated dissenter (who, frankly, often dined out in town); not two, but three autobiographical portraits by one inspiring man, a former slave; "the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war"; an elusive white whale. In this course, we'll study an extraordinarily prolific moment in American literary history—one that produced, in just a half-decade, many great American novels and poems: The Scarlet LetterUncle Tom's CabinMoby DickWalden, and Leaves of Grass are among the most famous. Indeed, these books' popularity, notoriety, and cultural afterlives are the reasons critics dubbed this period "The Renaissance." Though won't read all of these texts in full (of course! we'll spare your eyeballs!), we will read excerpts from several. We'll start, though, with an earlier moment, when the very idea of distinctively American writing—"Great" or otherwise—began to take hold in our cultural imaginations. Our project will be to trace what happens during this dynamic thirty-year period, which people have long read in terms of rising literary nationalism and individualism. While we'll trace those two important through-lines, we'll also push back against them by reading texts that challenge us to draw connections among diverse debates, problems, and representations of Americanness. Our course texts will likely include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Volume B 1820–1865, edited by Nina Baym; 978-0393927405), The Bondwoman's Narrative (by Hannah Crafts and edited by Henry Louis Gates; 978-0446690294), and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 426 - Contemporary American Literature

  • Rootedness & Restlessness
    Malphrus—TTH 10:50–12:05 crn 53928

    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor.

    In this course we will engage in a number of full length and briefer texts as we consider an essential tension in American Letters—the impetus of the open road (or sea or sky or mind) and the desire to stay put. We'll hop in the car with Jack Kerouac for On the Road; get rooted in Newfoundland with Annie Proulx's Pulitzer Prize winning The Shipping News; pile in with William Least Heat-Moon for Blue Highways: A Journey into America; and come home with Wendell Berry's endearing Jaber Crow. Along the way we'll take side trips with The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, Travels with Charley, Slaughterhouse-Five, Suttree, Lolita, Go in Beauty, Lonesome Dove, The Powwow Highway, To the White Sea, The Lost Continent, and Going After Cacciato. We'll also tip our hats to a few great on and off road stories from bygone days—Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Canterbury Tales, Don Quixote, Gulliver's Travels, Candide, The Time Machine, Heart of Darkness, Tender is the Night, The Sun Also Rises, As I Lay Dying, The Grapes of Wrath, The Way West, and The Lord of the Rings. Oh yes, and poetry—plenty of poetry! The class will be conducted in seminar fashion, with emphasis given to intense classroom discussion.

ENGL 439 - Selected Topics

  • Stories of War
    McCoy—TH 6:00-9:00 Beaufort campus crn 53923
    Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography. As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

    "It is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else's life with perfection." — Bhagavad Gita 

    Who tells the stories of war, and what is the difference between story and history, fact and fiction, lived experience and memory? What do we learn from wars, and how do we reconcile the tragic inevitability of combat? What kind of stories do soldiers, journalists, and veterans tell of war? How do those stories reconcile with political and social history? And what can an ancient spiritual text, centered around war, tell us about US wars still being fought? The complicated, intricate, and multi-layered human act of war requires scholars to look at conflict from as many angles as possible. "Stories of War" aims to do just that, with our primary focus being on the human experience of war and the historical and social contexts of conflict. This course includes a focus on themes of war, such as the role of the soldier as the storyteller, and the importance of cultural contexts and how and when wars "begin." We will narrow some of our focus on the Vietnam War (literature and oral history), but we will also look at recent conflicts in the Middle East (via the work of Pulitzer-winning journalism), but all of our study will be framed around the ancient Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita, an ancient dialogue between a soldier and his horse as they face the complexities of war and life, birth and death, action and inaction. War may present us with similar stories, but each storyteller offers us a chance to see the individual experience of the awful beauty of war. Books for the course: Bhagavad Gita (Edition required: ISBN 1586380192) Forever War (Dexter Filkins) Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans (Wallace Terry), and The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh). Open to students from any major.

ENGL 441 - History of Literary Theory and Criticism

  • Kilgore—MW 1:55–3:10 crn 53927
    Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor's consent. Counts as a THEORY course for the ENGL major or as an ENGL elective. Students from any major with an interest in how societies talk about truth, fiction, rhetoric, and history are especially welcome.

    … there is no such thing as literature which is 'really' great, or 'really' anything, independently of the ways in which that writing is treated within specific forms of social and institutional life. — Terry Eagleton

    This course is an introduction to literary theory in the Western tradition from the Greeks onward. We will focus especially on the Greeks (Homer, Plato, Aristotle) became they frame the conversation to follow, and because these are "writers" that later writers—and students of them— will seek to disrupt. We will read writers—poets, philosophers, historiographers, rhetoricans, theologicans, novelists, (and even professors!) —who have sought to describe what literature is and how it functions in society. Their conclusions are not obvious (and are often not really conclusions, but disruptions) and curious minds will be necessary for this odyssey. 

    Our explorations will entertain many of the following questions: What is literature / fiction / myth / poetry? What is it good for? How is it dangerous? What is its relationship with truth? beauty? rhetoric? inspriation? craft? wisdom? power? the Other? justice? —especially justice. We'll read Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's The Tempest, Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale or Hagseed, her revision of The Tempest if it's published in time— the following are not lengthy —Aristotle's Poetics, Longinus' On Great Writing, Philip Sidney's Defence of Poetry, Susan Glaspell's Trifles, and (through small chunks of text on Blackboard) possibly some Cicero, Horace, Augustine, Christine de Pizan, Shelley, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Emerson, Arnold, Derrida, Showalter, and Eagleton! Once the course is through, you'll have a good historical understanding of the debates and the means to enter into ongoing conversations about the roles of literatures in societies. 

    Required texts: Homer, The Odyssey (this translation is required: Robert Fagles, Penguin, ISBN 9780140268867); Plato, The Republic (this translation is required Desmond Lee, Penguin, 9780140455113); Aristotle's Poetics (trans. James Hutton, Norton, 9780393952162); Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (any edition, but Dover, 9780486268774 will be cheap); Longinus, On Great Writing (trans. G.M.A. Grube, Hackett, 9780872200807); William Shakespeare, The Tempest (any edition, but Penguin, 9780140714852 will be cheap); Margaret Atwood, The Handmaid's Tale (Knopf Doubleday, 9780385490818) but I'll alert you if we're doing Hagseed; John Caputo, Deconstruction in a Nutshell (Fordham, 9780823217557).

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing

  • Duffy—MWF 9:30-10:20 crn 51466 
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

    Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred. Open to students from any major.

ENGL 465 - Fiction Workshop

  • Malphrus—MW 3:20-4:35 crn 51481
    Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor's consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

    "The purpose of fiction is to help us answer the question we must constantly be asking ourselves: who do we think we are and what do we think we're doing?" -- Robert Stone

    If this two part question makes your fingers twitch, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand a student's awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

  • Kilgore—TBA
    Pre-req: departmental permission.

    Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.
  • Swofford—TTH 9:25-10:40 crn 57272
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as an English elective.

    What does "good" writing instruction look like? Can we really teach writing? In this class, we'll examine these questions, among others, as we examine the methods for teaching writing to students at a variety of levels. This course explores the theories and practices that inform writing instruction in K-12 classrooms, university classrooms, and writing centers. We are going to read about the "best practices" of teaching writing, watch experienced teachers guide student writers, and try out the things we've read and seen as we teach writing ourselves. In other words, the goal of this course is to provide students with both a strong theoretical foundation in writing pedagogy and the first-hand experience to put that theory into practice. Recommended for prospective K-12 and university writing teachers, writing center tutors, and English majors. Students who pass this course with a B or higher are eligible to apply to be paid tutors in the Writing Center.

ENGL 472 / THEA 472 - Cinema

  • McQuillen—M 6:15-9:15 crn 53925
    Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. As an ENGL course, counts as an English elective.

    Fire up the 70inch flat screen, crank up the surround sound, and turn the lights down…it's movie time! From Chief Brody declaring "We need a bigger boat" as he comes face to face with the giant shark in Jaws to Captain America's feelings of horror and sorrow at the realization that the Winter Soldier is his best friend, movies have a unique way to captivate and move so many of us. Yet, movies are both a shared and personal experience. Why do we like one film over another? Perhaps it's the witty dialogue, maybe it's the striking images in a scene, or maybe it's the emotional undertones of a great score. All of these reasons influence our decisions as to what makes for a good film, but there is much more at work in filmmaking. CINEMA 472 is an introduction to film class that will make use of engaging classroom discussions to find out what makes for an Oscar worthy film and what makes for a Razzie worthy film. We will do so by exploring the DNA of films to understand the importance of editing, lighting, camera angles, music, narrative structure, and other subconscious elements that help shape both our enjoyment and understanding of film.

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

  • Pate — Section 001 — MWF 8:30-9:20 crn 51432
    Pate — Section 002 — MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 56020

    No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    You don't have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 301 / ENGL 301 - Theater History I

  • Pate—MWF 11:30-12:20 crn 53930.
    Crosslisted with ENGL 301 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    Gods. Demons. Kings. The stages and pages of Western Theater History from the ancient Greeks to 1800 were filled with ritual and debate, religion and politics, economics and culture. In this course, we'll examine the development of theatrical texts and practices and their place in shaping social and aesthetic discourse. Part dramatic literature, part cultural history, this class digs deep into texts through close reading while also sending up a periscope to look around at all the other theatrical practices happening around the written word. We'll read about the impact of historical context on theater and about theater's impact on history. We'll read plays ranging from the Greek classics to medieval mystery plays to the Renaissance throughout Europe and through the Enlightenment. And, perhaps most importantly, we'll explore the theories of theater practitioners throughout history, in their own words, of how and why to create theater. Open to students from any major.

THEA 333 - Directing

  • Ricardo—MW 9:30-10:20 crn 56143
    Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    What do directors do? They conceptualize productions. They communicate with actors, designers, producers, and audiences. They read and interpret scripts. They are managers and teachers and artists and custodians of texts and iconoclasts. This class will train you in the art of directing plays while also asking you to study that role, its history, its challenges, its opportunities, its implications for how and why we make theater. You will start with simple assignments such as arranging actors in space to create a stage picture and build toward the final project of directing an entire scene from a play. You will also write a report on a professional director that analyses her directing style and methods.

THEA 472 / ENGL 472 - Cinema

  • McQuillen—M 6:15-9:15 crn 53926
    Crosslisted with ENGL 472 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

    From Stanley Kubrick's time and evolutionary transcending scene of early man throwing a bone in the air in 2001: A Space Odyssey to Captain America's feelings of horror and sorrow at the realization that the Winter Soldier is his best friend , movies have a unique way to captivate and move so many of us. Yet, movies are both a shared and personal experience. Why do we like one film over another? Perhaps it's the witty dialogue, maybe it's a striking images in a scene, or maybe it's the emotional undertones of a great score. All of these reasons influence our decisions as to what makes for a good film, but there is much more at work in filmmaking. CINEMA 472 is an introduction to film class that will make use of engaging classroom discussions to find out what makes for an Oscar worthy film and what makes for a Razzie worthy film. We will do so by exploring the DNA of films to understand the importance of editing, lighting, camera angles, music, structure, and other subconscious elements that help shape both our enjoyment and understanding of film.

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship

  • McCoy— crn 
    Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

    Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods

  • McCoy Online, consult with Professor. crn 53228
    Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

    Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

LBST 305 - Integrated Liberal Studies I

  • McCoy crn 
    One credit hour; can be repeated up to four credit hours. Prereqs: LBST 297; Permission of instructor.

    Students identify two courses in two different disciplines that have a correlative relationship beneficial to student's course of study. Student proposal of integrative study due pre-enrollment.

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography

  • Stories of War
    McCoy—TH 6:00-9:00 Beaufort campus crn 52519.
     Crosslisted with ENGL 439. 

    Who tells the stories of war, and what is the difference between story and history, fact and fiction, lived experience and memory? What do we learn from wars, and how do we reconcile the tragic inevitability of combat? What kind of stories do soldiers, journalists, and veterans tell of war? How do those stories reconcile with political and social history? And what can an ancient spiritual text, centered around war, tell us about US wars still being fought? The complicated, intricate, and multi-layered human act of war requires scholars to look at conflict from as many angles as possible. "Stories of War" aims to do just that, with our primary focus being on the human experience of war and the historical and social contexts of conflict. This course includes a focus on themes of war, such as the role of the soldier as the storyteller, and the importance of cultural contexts and how and when wars "begin." We will narrow some of our focus on the Vietnam War (literature and oral history), but we will also look at recent conflicts in the Middle East (via the work of Pulitzer-winning journalism), but all of our study will be framed around the ancient Hindu text the Bhagavad Gita, an ancient dialogue between a soldier and his horse as they face the complexities of war and life, birth and death, action and inaction. War may present us with similar stories, but each storyteller offers us a chance to see the individual experience of the awful beauty of war. Books for the course: Bhagavad Gita (Edition required: ISBN 1586380192) Forever War (Dexter Filkins) Bloods: An Oral History of the Vietnam War by Black Veterans (Wallace Terry), and The Sorrow of War (Bao Ninh). Open to students from any major.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines

  • McCoy— crn 50668
    Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Fall 2016

 

At a Glance—
200-level Writing: 211 Editing and Publishing. 222 Creative Writing.
200-level Literature: 270 World (can substitute for 290). 289 English II.
Pre-1800: 419 Social Justice and Renaissance Lit
Post-1800: 302 Theater History II. 429 Way(s) West. 437 Women Writers. 439 Social Reform Transatlantic. 
Writing Minor/Concentration: 460 Advanced. 461 Health Professions. 464 Poetry. 

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 211, 222, 200, 270, 289, 302, 460, and 461.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 270 are only offered in Fall semesters. Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters. 287 and 288 will be offered in Spring 2017.

For ENGL majors, the program requirement for a PHIL course can be met by LBST 397.

ENGL 200 - Introduction to English Studies

Barnes—TTh 12:15–1:30 crn 19809
Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 200 is designed as an overview of English Studies. This course is geared toward majors and minors as an introduction to the program, to those considering pursuing a degree in English, as well as to anyone interested in reading, writing, research, argumentation and education in the humanities. Together we will explore the history, present state of affairs, and potential futures of the discipline with an emphasis on the distinctive fields, practices, approaches, and terminology employed in the discipline. As we investigate Composition and Rhetoric, English Education, Literary Studies, Critical Theory, and Creative Writing, we will also hone your skills in the disciplinary fundamentals of critical thinking and reading, interpretation, research, and writing in various forms. Finally, we will discuss the diverse array of employment opportunities in the field. Texts to include: McComiskey, English Studies: An Introduction to the Discipline(s) (ISBN: 0814115446) and Pope’s Studying English Literature and Language (ISBN: 0415498767).

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 001: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40-2:55   crn 19807
Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB’s interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the third issue and the production of the fourth. Don’t miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on this now year-old tradition!

Section 002: The Pen Practicum
Malphrus—Tu 1:40–2:55; crn 19808
The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. 

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

Malphrus— MW 12:30–1:45 crn 19806.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

“Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people.” — Leo Burnett

Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and 102 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 270 - World Literature

McCoy—TTH 9:25-10:40 crn 25775
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor. For ENGL majors, this course can substitute for ENGL 290.

I am not born for one corner, the whole world is my native land. — Seneca

Travel the world without leaving the comforts of USCB in World Literature this fall! Spanning nearly every corner of the globe, this course emphasizes the study of texts and critical thinking about world culture through selected readings in major literary forms since 1700. Globetrot your way through the Enlightenment, Realism, Modernism, and Post-War/Post-Colonial eras while thinking about different cultures and ways of approaching life through literature. Authors from France, Italy, Russia, Germany, Spain, Denmark, Norway, India, United States, England, China, Japan, Argentina, Senegal, Romania, and Iran encourage us to engage in our world through unfamiliar and exotic eyes. We will be considering a variety of literary forms: poetry, short stories, plays, novels, and graphic novels. We will focus on ideas of representation (character, setting, and historical context) as well as how to approach cultural difference. Open to all majors.

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

Hoffer—TTH 3:05-4:20; crn 24655 
You don't need to take English Literature I before II. Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 289 offers you a survey (broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In fall 2016, our approach to this undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of survey course in English Studies. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as “literary history,” “tradition,” “convention,” “canon,” and “period.” We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will encounter major literary and cultural movements--Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. 

ENGL 302 / THEA 302 - Theater History II:

Pate—MW 12:30-1:45 crn 24657 You don't need to take Theater History I before II. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

ENGL 419 - Social Justice and Renaissance Literature

Kilgore—MW 1:55–3:10 crn 24658 
Crosslisted with LBST 351: Beyond the Classroom I (crn 27172). As an ENGL course, Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 419 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a PRE-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

What is justice? Where is justice? How is justice?

The former king, old Lear, suddenly homeless, is outside in a horrible rainstorm and begins to understand something of social injustice:

Poor naked wretches, whereso'er you are,
That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm,
How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides,
Your looped and windowed raggedness, defend you
From seasons such as these? Oh, I have taken
Too little care of this! Take physic, pomp.
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel,
That thou mayst shake the superflux to them
And show the heavens more just.

Lear wishes he had done more to help, and calls (too late to do any good) for a "more just" redistribution of the "superflux"--the wealth. In this course during this election season in the U.S., we will hear how unusual Shakespeare's words are in a king's mouth: we'll take a hard look at Renaissance social injustice in terms of economics, literacy, education, and differences of class, race, religion, ability, and gender -- reading accounts of the city of London, for example, learning about Queen Elizabeth's care for veterans of foreign wars, and seeking to better understand the status of immigrants and people of color in England. We'll think about how these Renaissance dynamics were played forward to shape the world upon our shores. We'll look for possible challenges to these dominant ideologies and brutal inactions --  paying attention to people who "did social justice" then and those who are "doing social justice" now, as we explore foundations of service learning and local organizations engaged in social justice work.

These cultural texts and theoretical texts will inform here-and-now community engagement, where we will go beyond the classroom and the campus. We will volunteer in our community (10 hours for the semester) and observe and participate in social justice work (we will find ways to make this work for everyone). This participation will be informed by the texts and theories we have studied, and the experience of community engagement will, in reciprocal fashion, help us better understand texts and theories.

Texts will include Thomas More's Utopia, Shakespeare's King Lear, and Claudia Rankine's Citizen (2014), as well as a variety of readings, viewings, and listenings that will be made available online. Folks taking the class under ENGL will do more literary type work than the LBST folks but will be pushed into interdisciplinary and community engagement directions: the final project will be a remediation of papers and assignments you've done in the class that have been re-intended for a local audience off campus -- perhaps a podcast, a video, or exhibit, but perhaps also a remediation that involves an enactment of social justice. LBST folks taking the class will engage their interdisciplinarity but also be pushed to think about words they read and write more carefully than is perhaps normal: the final project will be a researched proposal for a community project suitable for implementation in LBST 352.

ENGL 429 - The Way(s) West

Malphrus—TTH 12:15–1:30   crn 24659 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 429 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

West – the archetypal direction in American life and letters. Yet how do we define "Western Literature"? In this course, like Huck Finn, we will "light out for the Territory," perhaps hitching up where border fiction of the Old South leaves off, and make our way west, exploring literary depictions of people and places (and spirits and spaces) along the way.

As for writers, we will enjoy (summarily or in depth) many of the following: Willa Cather, Wallace Stegner, N. Scott Momaday, Terry Tempest Williams, A.B. Guthrie, Walter Van Tilburg Clark, Jack Schaefer, John Steinbeck, Louise Erdrich, Jack London, Ishmael Reed, Cormac McCarthy, Barbara Kingsolver, Nathaneal West, Thomas McGuane, Annie Proulx, Jim Harrison, William Eastlake, Mari Sandoz, Owen Wister, Thomas McGuane, Edward Abbey, Ivan Doig, and Amy Tan.

ENGL 437 - Women Writers

Hoffer—TTH 10:50-12:05   crn 24660 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

In this course, we will study the ways in which women writers from the 19th-21st centuries have imagined the future. Working across the utopian, dystopian and apocalyptic genres, women writers have cultivated their own tradition of speculative literature that is every bit as richly various and complex as similar but more well-known works by male authors. By pairing the fiction we read with excerpts from landmark arguments by prominent Feminist, Gender Studies, and Queer theorists, we will see how envisioning the fates of society, humanity, and our planet has afforded these writers the opportunity to explore alternative realities in which revisions to our understanding of gender and sexuality take center stage. Readings to be drawn from the work of Mary Shelley, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Ayn Rand, Diana Russ, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, P.D. James, Suzanne Collins, and Veronica Roth.

ENGL 439 - Social Reform and Transatlanticism

Barnes—TTH 4:30–5:45 crn 24661 
Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography (crn xxxxx). As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a POST-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

When you turn to the last two pages of Claudia Rankine’s Citizen (2014), you’ll see one of the most haunting, most perennially discussed canvases of the nineteenth century: J.M.W. Turner’s The Slave Ship (1840). (To study Rankine’s book, take “Social Justice and Renaissance Literature with Dr. Kilgore!) Turner’s painting, celebrated for its abolitionism even more perhaps than its proto-impressionism, was inspired by histories of the Zong, a slave ship “whose captain, in 1781, had thrown overboard sick and dying slaves so that he could collect insurance money available only for slaves ‘lost at sea’” (see more about the painting at the MFA’s digital galleries, which I’ve quoted above). To interpret Rankine’s interfacing pages, we might read Turner’s source texts; or the unfinished, unpublished lines he wrote three decades before painting the enormous 35¾ x 48¼ inch canvas; or John Ruskin’s reflections of it in his mid-century tome Modern Painters (1843); or Mark Twain’s un-tongue-in-cheek praise of Ruskin and Turner in A Tramp Abroad (1880). Our instincts would also remind us to read historical, art historical, and literary scholarship—to understand the Zong as one of too many tragedies over too many centuries of transatlantic slavery. We’d need to zoom in and out of ever-proliferating pages and screens. In fact, we’ll do all of this, and we’ll still be faced with a sense of bewilderment for a past we cannot fully fathom.

These are the kinds of circuitous, multi-layered, nested, encompassing reading practices that “Transatlanticism and Social Reform” will require us to do. Even the word transatlanticism urges us to check some of the most fundamental organizing principles in, for instance, surveys of British literature, or seminars in American literature, 1865–1914. A transatlanticist might wonder—who/what do we read when we emphasize national boundaries or periodize cultural moments and movements with wars? why do we read American literature and British literature, or Ruskin and Twain, in isolation from one another, or from the rest of the world? what happens to people whose citizenship proves to be much more difficult? how, then, do we remember the Zong or what revisionist criticism calls the Black Atlantic?

In this spirit, this course is cross-listed as a seminar in literature and in cultural historiography, since it introduces transatlanticism with a focus on social reform across the long nineteenth century. Our reading sequences will cover diverse authors, genres, and issues, but we’ll devote most of our semester to abolitionist movements. While our primary material will be literature, our studies will be necessarily interdisciplinary. We’ll read across oceans and intellectual fields, placing diaries, stories, rallying cries, poems, and travel narratives in conversation with drawings, paintings, and sculptures. I’ll situate discussions of course texts within historical and theoretical frameworks and we’ll read passages from critical articles/books. Our reading will challenge us to suss out not only what transatlanticism is, though, but also what it invites us to do. For me, this distinction is central to our course topic. We’ll work toward understanding transatlanticism at several registers: first, as an important turn in American Studies, Cultural Studies, Hemispheric Studies; second, apart from these capital-letter-type words, as reading practices that illuminate texts, contexts, and critical afterlives that might otherwise remain illegible in traditional courses or forms of scholarship.

Since this course isn’t about American writers becoming more American abroad, British writers becoming more British abroad, or concurrent swells in patriotic literatures, our reading sequences will be a little this-and-that; many resist “easy” national identities and aesthetic/generic categories. We’ll study works that are part fiction, part nonfiction, part guidebook, part polemic; poems inspired by other poems inspired by sculptures; and contemporary revisions of long-nineteenth-century “classics.” We’ll read letters Margaret Fuller published from Italy in the New-York Daily Tribune as a pioneering international correspondent. We’ll study Herman Melville’s Benito Cereno and Yusef Komunyakaa’s lyric reinterpretation of it; poems by Felicia Hemans and Lydia Huntley Sigourney, Elizabeth Barrett Browning and John Greenleaf Whittier; narratives by Olaudah Equiano and Mary Prince; travelogues by Harriet Martineau and Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mary Seacole and Mark Twain; and sections from two of Frederick Douglass’s three autobiographies.

While not a prerequisite, “Abolitionism in the Sea Islands” (Summer 2016; CRN 75266) will serve as a companion course to “Transatlanticism and Social Reform.” Both are interdisciplinary in spirit and in practice, designed for literature majors/minors and liberal studies folks.

ENGL 460 - Advanced Writing: Writing for Non-Profits

Swofford—MW 4:45-6:00 crn 24662
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

How can writing benefit the public good? In this section of English 460, Writing for Non-Profits, you will have the opportunity to benefit your community as we explore how not-for-profit organizations use writing to raise funds for the cause, change hearts and minds, and motivate participation from real-world audiences. As a class, we will create materials together for a local organization, and you will also produce texts for an organization of your choosing. We will first learn to examine the rhetorical situation of individual organizations in order to create a needs-based writing plan, then, depending on the organization, you may create rhetorically-savvy social media posts, blogs, grants, press releases, position papers, reports, policy briefs, or other public relations documents. We will learn to analyze genre and audience as a means of most effectively assisting non-profits in accomplishing their missions. Along the way, we will discover and develop strategies using new media rhetorics, project and client management, and professional communication skills. By the end of this course, you will be able to write effectively for non-profits as either professionals or volunteers.

ENGL 461 - Writing in Health Professions

Leaphart— Hybrid: W 3:20-4:35 and online crn 25464 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports.

ENGL 464 - Poetry Workshop

Malphrus—MW 3:20-4:35 crn 19799
Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

"A poet is someone for whom words have the maximum of significance," said James Dickey. If words do indeed matter to you in this way, then pack up your muses and join us for a semester of learning the art and craft of poetry writing. English 464 is a workshop formatted course designed to expand awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of poetry.

The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives of poetry by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Further, each student will create a variety of original poetry, including the following forms: cinquain, couplet, quatrain, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, haiku, and blank verse.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

Kilgore—TBA
Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.

 

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

Ricardo — Section 001 — MWF 8:30-9:20 crn 19810
Ricardo — Section 002 — MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 20871

No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

You don’t have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.

THEA 200 - Understanding and Appreciation of Theater

Pate—TTH 8:00-9:15 crn 25566
No Pre-reqs. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We’ll look at Western theater’s roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater’s place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.

THEA 201 - Introduction to Script Analysis

Ricardo—MWF 10:30-11:20 crn 20847
Pre-reqs: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Is it a literature class? Or is it a theater class? Yes! In this class, we’ll read several plays and discuss techniques for analyzing them to pull out such elements as tone, character, and theme, much as you would do for any close reading work in a literature class. However, our analysis will maintain a specialized focus on applications for performance. In other words, we’ll constantly ask how our close readings might be useful to an actor, a director, or a set or costume designer. We’ll also learn how to do historical and critical research to learn about a play’s production history and the discourse it has provoked. Our writing assignments will focus on how to communicate our analysis and research in the way that will be most accessible and useful to varying audiences including theater practitioners and theater patrons.

THEA 220 - Theater Laboratory

Pate—TBA crn 24663
1 credit course. Supervised participation in theatre production. No formal class meetings. May be repeated for up to 8 credits. Contact Dr. Pate - you must have his permission to register for the course.

THEA 302 / ENGL 302 - Theater History II:

Pate—MW 12:30-1:45 crn 24664.
You don't need to take Theater History I before II. Crosslisted with ENGL 302 above. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We’ll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We’ll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We’ll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater’s desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We’ll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don’t let the 2 fool you; there’s no need to take Theater History I before taking this class.

THEA 370 - Intermediate Acting

Ricardo—MWF 9:30-10:20 crn 24665
Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Building on the basics established in Fundamentals, this class exposes students to other performance forms and training techniques. The class functions as an ensemble, with each student responsible to the group and vice versa. As an ensemble, we will create a devised theater piece before moving into monologue and scene work. Students are expected not only to take their own work seriously but also to provide thoughtful and constructive feedback on their peers’ work, which will also include several composition pieces in which students create small solo performances.

 

LBST 305 - Integrated Liberal Studies I

McCoy crn 24063
One credit hour; can be repeated up to four credit hours. Prereqs: LBST 297; Permission of instructor.

Students identify two courses in two different disciplines that have a correlative relationship beneficial to student’s course of study. Student proposal of integrative study due pre-enrollment.

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography

Social Reform and Transatlanticism
Barnes—TTH 12:15–1:30  crn 27173.
 Crosslisted with ENGL 439. See description above.

LBST 351 - Beyond the Classroom: Community Project I

Social Justice and Renaissance Literature
KilgoreMW 1:55–3:10   crn 27172.
 Crosslisted with ENGL 419. See description above.

LBST 352 - Beyond the Classroom: Community Project II

McCoy— crn 27602 
Pre-req: LBST 351

Each of us finds his unique vehicle for sharing with others his bit of wisdom. – Ram Dass

You’ve decided to make a difference in the world – and now is the time to implement it! Let’s see what happens when you put all those plans and proposals you created into action! Conducted as a small tutorial, this course allows students to explore and perform ideas for community change formulated in LBST B351.

LBST 397 - Readings in Philosophy: Virtue and Vice

McCoy—T 10:50-12:05 crn 25565
For ENGL majors, this course will satisfy the program requirement for a PHIL course.

It is the hour to be drunken! To escape being the martyred slaves of time, be ceaselessly drunk. On wine, on poetry, or on virtue, as you wish. – Baudelaire

Pride. Envy. Anger. Sloth. Gluttony. Greed. Lust.

Prudence. Fortitude. Temperance. Justice. Faith. Hope. Love.

Which virtues do you possess? Vices? How do these ethics apply for your plan to be a nurse, a writer, an entrepreneur, or a teacher? How might these beliefs influence you as a roommate, a student, a friend, a partner, or a parent? The seven virtues and seven vices of traditional Western thought represent more than just guideposts for living “a good life”; these 2,000 years-old tenets of human ethics continue to persist in contemporary works of art and literature – why? What is it about the human condition that historically insists we strive for goodness while avoiding bad behavior? And do we still value these beliefs? Use this interdisciplinary course to examine how cultural concepts of beliefs and principles influence you and your individual disciplinary practices. We will study excerpts from a variety of works, including Plato's Republic, the Bible, Dante's Purgatorio, and paintings by Giotto, Veronese, Cadmus and Brueghel. Open to all majors.

LBST 497 - Seminar in Liberal Studies among the Disciplines

McCoy— crn 20562
Prereq: Senior standing in Liberal Studies or consent of the instructor.

Summer 2016

ENGL 429 - Abolitionism in the Sea Islands

Barnes—Maymester M-F 11:00–1:45 crn 75266 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. 429 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

What can a celebrated actress from London, a determined schoolteacher from Philadelphia, and a now-infamous fugitive slave couple from Macon teach us about Abolitionism in the Sea Islands? How did a woman free herself and her husband by passing and cross-dressing all the way from Middle Georgia to Savannah, Charleston, and Philadelphia? What did life hold for them in Boston and—after the Fugitive Slave Law passed in 1850—in Liverpool? Why did they return the lowcountry years later, hoping to build a farm and a school? How did England’s Shakespearean starlet—mid-century’s famed Juliet and Portia—become a different kind of transatlantic sensation? How did her divorce complicate/facilitate the publication of once-private journals: scathing critiques of plantation slavery? How did people fight for justice in the place we call home, just before and after emancipation?

Spend the first few weeks of summer learning about social reform networks in our own neck of the woods. We live in an extremely important place for nineteenth-century studies: a hotbed of secession and difficult reconstruction, yes, but also the sometime home to diverse abolitionist authors, educators, and activists. In this course, we’ll study a series of nineteenth-century texts with local composition, circulation, and reception histories. We’ll explore what people wrote about landmarks and watershed events that still punctuate our sense of place in Beaufort, Jasper, and Chatham Counties by reading powerful, painful, inspiring books. We’ll also take advantage of our compressed summer schedule to do some in situ reading and researching that will help us study mid-century St. Helena’s and St. Simon’s Islands, Mitchelville and Woodville, Charleston and Savannah, Butler Plantation and Seaside Plantation. In fact, part of our work will require off-the-page/on-the-road time: touring the Penn Center, visiting the Camp Saxton marker and the William and Ellen Craft medallion at SCAD (just installed in February 2016).

I’m organizing our three weeks around three texts: Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom by William and Ellen Craft (published 1860), Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation by Fanny Kemble (written, 1838–1839; published 1863); and Charlotte Forten Grimké’s Journals and essays about the Port Royal Experiment and the Penn School (written, 1861–1864; published 1953). To contextualize this focused reading sequence, we’ll also study short passages by writers whose deep-rooted, sprawling abolitionist networks challenge us to engage seriously with current debates in American Studies about precarious historical and geopolitical boundaries. We’ll place our writers in serious conversation with Laura Towne, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry David Thoreau, and Angelina and Sarah Grimké—and map important triangulations that link the lowcountry to Boston, Concord, and Philadelphia. By stressing the presence of the lowcountry in narratives by authors who emigrated or were displaced as fugitives, we’ll learn to read abolitionism regionally and nationally at the same time. As we’ll discover, our most local, coastal texts also require us to think transatlantically. In this spirit, our culminating writing project will link our university to our broader community. Students will create multimodal annotations / editions of excerpted passages as alternatives to traditional, researched close reading essays. Our goal is to make projects that enrich (maybe recast, maybe unnerve) people’s perspectives of our most immediate worlds.

ENGL 439 - Dystopia: Visions of the Future in Fiction & Film

Hoffer—Summer 10-Week T 1:00-3:30   crn 72962
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. All students interested in dystopian, speculative- or science-fiction are welcome, regardless of major! 439 is a Topics course and can be repeated for credit for different topics. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.

dys·to·pi·a 
an imagined place or state in which everything is unpleasant or bad, typically a totalitarian or environmentally degraded one.

Meeting once a week, we will study dystopian fiction and film from the 20th-21st centuries in order to explore a broad range of conceptions and expectations regarding the nature and fate of humanity. Together, we will consider the state of affairs in our own day and age alongside such questions as: How have past generations of writers envisioned the future based on their own contemporary concerns? What common fears have dystopian texts forecast, and to what extent are those projections a reality or still a possibility today? What can this literary genre reveal about universal human qualities and anxieties? As inheritors of this legacy of dystopian fiction, how are our own imaginings for the future similar or different, and what insights can this offer us into our own present? Students will write two brief papers, take a final exam, and participate in a collaborative class project to compose and produce our own dystopian short film. Note: While NOT a pre-requisite, this course will provide a foundation for ENGL 437 Women Writers: [Re]Visions of the Future, offered this fall 2016. Interested students are encouraged, though not required, to enroll in both.

Texts and films likely to include: Zamyatin’s We (1921), Huxley’s Brave New World (1932), Orwell’s 1984 (1949), Moore’s V for Vendetta (1988), Anderson’s Feed (2002); A Clockwork OrangeMad MaxNever Let Me GoThe Matrix.

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing

Duffy—Summer 10-Week Online  crn 72957 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Recent graduates find that communication in the workplace is often different than expectations would lead one to believe. The variety of methods, circumstances, and audiences dictate different needs for communication methodology. Technical Writing is more than writing about technology; it is writing technically to analyze, explain, and instruct audiences up and down the management chain internally, as well as externally. Projects in technical writing will practice both short- and long-term efforts, in both individual and group work settings. The text for the course will be the Handbook of Technical Writing by Gerald J. Alred.

ENGL 466 - Writing Internship

Kilgore—TBA
Pre-req: departmental permission.

Internship in writing, editing, proofreading, and/or research with a community organization or publication, with training in writing effectively for diverse audiences in a workplace setting. If you are interested, please read this and contact Dr. Kilgore for more information.

THEA 340 - Oral Interpretation of Literature

Pate—Summer 1st Half M-TH 10:30-12:45 crn 75267
Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor. Crosslisted in the Academic Bulletin with COMM 340.

When we think of literature, we think of the page. But all literature has its roots in the oral tradition; the earliest classics were spoken or sung and only written down much later. Let’s give the page a voice again. In this class, we’ll study healthy vocal practices and discuss how to apply our skills in literary analysis to the public performance of texts. We’ll also look for advice on delivery from classical rhetoric texts as well as more recent material. By practicing on delivering literary texts, you’ll gain skills that can apply to any public speaking situation. By the end of the semester, we will, as a class, devise a performance piece cobbled together from some of our favorite poems, short stories, and other works all related to a central theme we’ll decide on together.

LBST 250 - Liberal Studies Internship

McCoy— crn 75147
Pre-req: Liberal Studies major or minor only, completion of LBST 297, consent of instructor.

Provides students with the opportunity to apply interdisciplinary research skills across culturally diverse populations in a professional setting. Minimum requirement of 150 service hours.

LBST 297 - Interdisciplinary Research Methods

McCoy—online crn 75474
Pre-req: 45 hours of General Studies and acceptance into the LBST program

Introduction into individualized study including initial proposal development, review of courses and bibliography.

 

SPRING 2016 

 

At a Glance 
200-level Writing: 211 Editing and Publishing. 222 Creative Writing.
200-level Literature: 287 American. 288 English I. 289 English II.
Pre-1800: 310 Shakespeare.
Post-1800: 302 Theater History II. 422 American 1860-1910.  427 Southern. 429 Vietnam War.  
Theory: 442 Modern Theory.
Writing Minor/Concentration: 461 Health Professions. 462 Technical. 465 Fiction.

Great Gen Ed & Elective Courses requiring only 101 and 102, or equivalents, as pre-reqs: 211, 222, 287, 288, 289, 302, 461, and 462.

Scheduling Notes: 200 and 290 are only offered in Fall semesters. 289 and Theory courses are only offered in Spring semesters.

ENGL 211 - Editing and Publishing Practicum

Co-requisite: 200-level English course or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; may repeat this course up to 6 times.

Section 001: The May River Review: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal
Hoffer & Barnes—Th 1:40–2:55   crn 53578
Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB’s interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the second issue and the production of the third. Don’t miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on this now year-old tradition!

Section 002: The Pen Practicum
Malphrus—T 1:40–2:55   crn 53579
The Pen, a publication of the Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and (if the budget allows) artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative writing, evaluate submissions, compose style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself. 

ENGL 222 - Creative Writing across the Curriculum

Malphrus— MW 12:30– 1:40  crn 53581.
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective.

“Curiosity about life in all of its aspects, I think, is still the secret of great creative people.” — Leo Burnett

Got curiosity? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We’ll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we’ll read examples of each.  Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished.  Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress.  All you need are English 101 and 102 and a desire to mess around with words.

ENGL 287 - American Literature 

Barnes—TTH  4:30–5:45   crn 53582
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2015? In this survey, we’ll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we’ll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I’ll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you’ll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We’ll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers’ revisionist impulses, we’ll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.

ENGL 288 - English Literature I

Galloway HolmesMW 11:30 - 12:20  crn 53538
Course offered in hybrid format (in person and online). Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

This course will cover over one thousand years of English literature, beginning with some of the oldest known documents written in the English language.  Our literary journey will begin with warriors battling monsters in the pagan world of Beowulf, and end with the fall of man in John Milton’s Paradise Lost.   We will read texts by some of the biggest names in British literature to include Chaucer and Shakespeare, as well as a representative sample of lesser-known writers such as Marie de France, Edmund Spenser, and Christopher Marlowe.  As we read, we will track the evolution of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English.   As we read, we will explore how literature functions as a vehicle to relate universal truths about the human experience, and we will examine how texts attempt to answer the question of “what does it mean to be human?”  We will explore dichotomies in texts dealing with concepts such as fate and fortune, good and evil, and pride and humility.  Heroes and villains will take the stage, as well as priests, prostitutes, and knights of King Arthur’s court.  The required text for this course will be the ninth edition of the three volume The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volumes A, B, & C (ISBN 978-0-393-91300-2).

ENGL 289 - English Literature II: Pasts, Presents, Futures...

HofferTTH 3:05 - 4:20  crn 53576 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, and as a pre-requisite for the English major/minor.

ENGL 289 is intended to offer you a survey (a broad overview) of major writers and works in the British literary tradition from the 18th to the 21st century. In Spring 2016, our approach to this mammoth undertaking will be to examine, and to interrogate, some of the very principles that underpin the rationale for this type of survey course in English Studies curriculum. This means we will think critically about not only the literature we study but also about such terms as “literary history,” “tradition,” “convention,”  “canon,” “period,” “adaptation,” “revision,” “innovation,” “original,” “classic,” “modern,” and “postmodern.” We will achieve this by focusing on the ways authors and texts engage with time, representing various perspectives on pasts, presents, and futures in their form and content. Along the way, we will encounter major literary and cultural movements--Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern—, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required reading likely to include: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature, Vol. B 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335) as well as Jane Austen’s Persuasion, Charles Dickens’s Hard Times, Virginia Woolf’s Between the Acts, and Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go.

ENGL 302/ THEA 302 -  Theater History II:

PateMWF 10:30 - 11:20 crn 53596 Counts as a post-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

Theatrical Modernisms: The 19th century Melodrama, the theatrical realization of Romanticism, sparked an obsession with the modern among theater-makers that persists to this day. Theater becomes obsessed with breaking from its own past even as it continuously recreates it.  Realism rejects melodrama, expressionism rejects realism, absurdism rejects itself, and the postdramatic rejects drama in favor of pure theatricality. Through each of these moments, we’ll read not only plays but also essays on acting, directing, scene design, and other theatrical disciplines by the very artists who defined the development of Western theater. Rather than construct a linear narrative, we’ll try to navigate the complex network of influences and reactions that constitute theater for the last two hundred years. We’ll watch recorded performances of everything from Peter Brook’s hugely influential Marat/ Sade to the Open Theater’s street performances such as Paradise Now. The time we cover includes theater riots and riots as theater. It’s raucous, messy, and performative. Come join in the fun.

ENGL 310/ THEA 310 -  Reading and Performing Shakespeare 

Kilgore & PateMW 1:55 - 3:10   ENGL crn 56331 THEA crn 56332 
Counts as a pre-1800 course for the English major or minor or for the Theater minor. This course is cross-listed as ENGL and THEA. It doesn't matter which discipline you add to your schedule for USCB's purposes: the course will automatically count for either ENGL and THEA depending on your major or minor.

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
Sounds and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
Caliban, The Tempest 3.2

"Shakespeare" is both a fixed text and something that is in motion. The goal of this course (taught jointly by Dr. Pate and Dr. Kilgore) is to study performance history and critical history while performing and doing criticism—to encourage you to think and read and experience and perform “Shakespeare” —beyond yet through the text.  As a joint Theater and English course, we intend to flex your understandings of and inspire your imaginations about words we use casually like “text,” “interpretation,” performance.” You will be asked to understand a variety of plays as literary texts, sure, but also as living performances—both in the here and now and historically. And you will be asked (and you’ll get help doing this) to perform some yourself, to breathe in and out real air while you “play” “Shakespeare” in front of real and imagined audiences. Texts: Folger Library Editions (Simon and Schuster) of Twelfth Night (9780743484961), Henry V (780743484879), The Tempest (9780743482837), and Romeo and Juliet (9780743477116), as well as Russ McDonald, The Bedford Companion to Shakespeare: An Introduction with Documents, 2nd ed. (978-0312248802)

ENGL 422 - American Literature, 1860-1910

Barnes—MW 4:45–6:00   crn 53606 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor. 

Picture the Upper Bay, the harbor between the Atlantic Ocean and the Hudson River, the port of New York and New Jersey, our Eastern Seaboard starting point for mapping the field of U.S. Literature, 1860–1910. Imagine this storied spot in 1855 and in 1904, two distinct cultural moments, overlapping one another in your mind, if only for a minute. In 1855, Walt Whitman (world-renowned Brooklyn Bard, self-proclaimed “Son of Manhattan Island”) published the first edition of the poem that would become Song of Myself. Whitman, addressing us and turning west, wonders: “Have you reckoned a thousand acres much? Have you reckoned the earth much? / Have you practised so long to learn to read? / Have you felt so proud to get at the meaning of poems?” As he draws us into this expansive lyric, he urges us to question how we read, how we know what we know, how we survey our place on this globe, and—implicitly and importantly—how we connect such seemingly sundry invocations. In fact, Whitman himself avows elsewhere that “the United States themselves are essentially the greatest poem.” Henry James writes along similar lines fifty years later, when his steamship lands just across the harbor. After living and writing abroad for over two decades (without having returned once), he arrived in Hoboken, overwhelmed by how much had changed in his country and in his mind. “My visit to America had been the first possible to me for nearly a quarter of a century,” James writes, “and I had before my last previous one, brief and distant to memory, spent other years in continuous absence; so that I was to return with much of the freshness of eye, outward and inward, which, with the further contribution of a state of desire, is commonly held a precious agent of perception.” The American Scene, published in 1904–1905, opens by looking “outward and inward,” inland and out-to-sea/over-the-pond all at once—and by connecting expatriation, even estrangement, to his refreshed sense of narrative perspective. 

English 422 covers this fascinating period in U.S. literary history: from Walt Whitman to Henry James, from the years just before the Civil War to the years just before the First World War. We’ll begin our course by studying Henry David Thoreau’s “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” written about a moment that divided the nation and precipitated the Civil War: Harpers Ferry and its aftermath in the fall of 1859. In 1910, our stop-point, Wilbur and Orville Wright piloted their only flight together in Ohio and Glacier National Park was established in Montana. Between 1910 and 1911, our cultural gaze telescopes from the cosmic to the subatomic, from Halley’s comet to Ernest Rutherford’s gold foil experiment. Such watersheds remind us that this half-century is bookended by incredible innovations, but also by national and global fractures; at the same time, it’s known now for the rise of American Regionalism. We’ll study these capital-letter eras and terms: the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Gilded Age, the Jim Crow Era, the Great American Poet, the International Novel, Regionalism, Realism, Naturalism, fin-de-siècle Aestheticism, and some Modernist inklings. 

One way to approach this period has been to read the canon geopolitically, from North and South to World Power. Another has been to trace U.S. letters through cosmopolitanism or internationalism. We’ll think about the ways these texts invite us to hone reading practices that re-draw literary borderlines and literary margins. We’ll focus on representations of American lives that require us to think locally and globally at the same time. Interestingly, many of the most famous texts from this period have complex revision, publication, circulation, reception, and censorship histories that span several decades. In addition to focusing on the significance of place, then, we’ll also study what happens to literature itself during this tumultuous period—especially since such changes are bound to critical calls for reading regionally and transatlantically. Our course texts include Emily Dickinson ArchiveWalt Whitman ArchiveThe Rise of Silas Lapham by William Dean Howells; (ISBN: 9781593082871); The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James (ISBN: 9780141439631); Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman (ISBN: 9780393974966); American Women Regionalists edited by Judith Fetterley and Marjorie Pryse (ISBN: 9780393313635);one novel by Mark Twain (tbd) and excerpts from The Innocents Abroad and Life on the Mississippi.

ENGL 427 - Southern Literature

Malphrus—TTH 10:50–12:05   crn 53601 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.  

“You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view--until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”                                                                                        -- Harper Lee

Let’s do it! Let’s climb inside some skin and see what we can make of Southern Literature – starting with the hot-off-the-press “sequel” to To Kill a Mockingbird.  And since USCB hosted “Conroy at 70: A Celebration of South Carolina’s Prince of Titles” last semester, we’ll read The Prince of Tides. Then we’ll continue our focus on Carolina with James Dickey’s Deliverance, Ron Rash’s One Foot in Edenand Gloria Naylor’s Mama Day. Of course there will be Faulkner as well (Go Down, Moses)We’ll also tip our hats to top guns such as Mark Twain, Eudora Welty, Richard Wright, Robert Penn Warren, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and we’ll focus our attention specifically on South Carolina writers – from William Gilmore Simms to Henry Timrod to Mary Boykin Chesnut to Julia Peterkin to DuBose Heyward to Percival Everett to Josephine Humphreys to Dorothy Allison to Nikky Finney. 

ENGL 429 - Topics in American Lit: The Vietnam War

McCoy—TTH 9:25-10:40   crn 54309 
Crosslisted with LBST 331: Topics in Cultural Historiography (crn 56327). As an ENGL class, pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts as a post-1800 course for the the English major or minor.  

This course uses film, autobiographies, oral histories, literature, and historical texts to examine the Vietnam War (1955-1975). We will look at everything from how the war began to who its major players were, with the aim of gaining an interdisciplinary understanding of American cultural history. Open to all majors.

ENGL 442 - Principles of Modern Literary Theory - Once Upon a Theory

HofferTTH 12:15 – 1:30  crn 53604 
Pre-req: one 200-level lit course or instructor’s consent. Counts towards the major or minor. Meets the major literary theory requirement. 

Theory is often described as a lens:  a distinct set of terms and ideas that, when “put on” like a pair of glasses, enables a different way of seeing and understanding the world—or, when it comes to literary theory, a different way of seeing and understanding texts.  Theory has a long history reaching all the way back to antiquity, but the 20th century was what many consider the heyday of literary theory as one after another “school” emerged and transformed the way scholars think about literature and culture. In this course, we will try on many different lenses as we study the development and nature of several major modern theories.  The course has two principal goals:  1.) to expose you to a number of critical theories through a study of the terminology, concepts, and primary texts by the theorists who helped to define those perspectives, and 2.) to enable you to use these theories in order to formulate your own interpretive arguments about texts. The focus of our theoretical applications for in-class discussion and writing assignments —the playground upon which we will enact these theoretical principles—will be the fairy tale tradition. Through our examination of classic fairy tales and their contemporary adaptations (many of these revisions shaped by the very theories we will encounter), we will practice using theory to create literary criticism.  We will investigate the types of readings available through each theoretical perspective; explore how different theories can be applied to a single text to allow for a rich diversity of meaning; and discover the ways that theories can be blended together to form still further innovations in interpretation.  Required texts: Critical Theory Today, 3rd ed.(ISBN 9780415506755), Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies (ISBN 9780199797776 ) and The Classic Fairy Tales (ISBN 9780393972771).

ENGL 461 - Writing in Health Professions

Leaphart— Hybrid: T 3:05 - 4:20 and online    crn 56329 
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

Preparation for and practice in types of writing important to those working within the health care and health promotion industry, from brief letters to formal articles and reports. 

ENGL 462 - Technical Writing 

Duffy—MWF 9:30 - 10:20  crn 53608
Pre-requisites: ENGL 101 and 102 or equivalents with C or higher. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective, or for the English minor and major and as a writing concentration course.

In this course, students will balance practice and theory to lay the foundation for a career as a technical writer. Technical writing is not so much in the writing about technology, but in explaining things technically to audiences which may be unfamiliar with a certain subject matter. Students complete writing projects that develop the practical skills that professional writers use on the job. Activities will include conducting research for audience analysis; techniques of document design; fundamentals of the visual display of data; and team project work that will require use of in-person and online communication tools. Assignments for the course will range in size and scope, individual and group formats, in order to best realize the various rhetorical situations students may expect to experience in professional fields. Text: Alred, Gerald, et al. Handbook of Technical Writing, 10th ed. ISBN 13: 978-1250004413.

ENGL 465 - Fiction Workshop 

Malphrus—MW 3:20 - 4:35  crn 53628
Pre-requisite: one 200-level literature course, or instructor’s consent. Counts toward the major or minor and toward the Writing Concentration. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

“Get it down.  Take chances. It may be bad, but it’s the only way you can do anything really good.”— William Faulkner

If this quotation resonates, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand your awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. Texts for the course are The Art of Fiction by John Gardner (ISBN-10: 0679734031), Pep Talks, Warnings, and Screeds: Indispensable Wisdom and Cautionary Advice for Writers by George Singleton (ISBN-10: 1582975655), and Bird by Bird by Anne Lamott (ISBN-10: 0385480016).

 

THEA 170 - Fundamentals of Acting

RicardoSection 001 - MWF 8:30 - 9:20 crn 53569
RicardoSection 002 - MWF 11:30 - 12:20 crn 53571
Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

Everyone is a performer. Presentations, interviews, and, yes, even plays on stage are all performances. Acting is about communicating, and this class will help give you the tools to recognize and improve your own performance ability on the stage and in your life. We’ll also have a lot of fun. Through an exploration of major acting techniques, improvisation (yes, we will play improv games!), script analysis, and scene study, this class will make you more aware of how you use the tools of your voice and body to present a character or a persona. Never done any acting before? Great! Been in more plays than you can remember? Also great! This class is open to performers of all skill level and experience, and dreams of Hollywood or Broadway are not a prerequisite (although they won’t hurt, either). Join us for a fun way to strengthen your communication skills and gain a greater appreciation for and understanding of the performing arts. Required text and ISBN: Acting is Believing, 12th ed., Kenneth Stilson (ISBN: 9781285465050)

THEA 302 -  Theater History II:

PateMWF 10:30 - 11:20 crn 53596. Crosslisted with ENGL 302 above.

THEA 310 -  Reading and Performing Shakespeare 

Kilgore & PateMW 1:55 - 3:10  Crosslisted with ENGL 310 above.

THEA 370 - Intermediate Acting

RicardoMWF 9:30 - 10:20 crn 54409
Pre-req: THEA 170. Counts as humanities, fine arts, or liberal arts elective, and for the Theater minor.

 

LBST 331 - Topics in Cultural Historiography (The Vietnam War)

McCoyTTH 9:25-10:40   crn 54309.Crosslisted with ENGL 429 above.

LBST 351 - Beyond the Classroom I

McCoyTTH 4:30 -5:45 crn 54489

This course revolves around you -- and what you want to do for your community. You'll learn what it takes to start a project in a community, and get it ready for implementation (and you'll learn, conveniently, about club budgets). Take this course to enhance what you already do in a USCB organization or see what you can do in the broader community -- everyone is welcome!

LBST/PHIL 363 - Philosophy of Film

Skeesonline crn 56511
The philosophy of film is a rapidly growing subfield of contemporary philosophy of art that has experienced a certain renaissance since the 1980s. In this course, we will address the philosophy of film topically. Topics will include the nature of film; film and authorship; film and emotion; films and narrators; and the social/political import of films. Finally, we will ask ourselves what we can learn from films.