Upcoming Courses

Spring 2019 Courses

Look below for extended course descriptions of upcoming English, Theater, and Interdisciplinary Studies courses written by the instructors who will teach them. Visit the archive of past ETLS courses.

English Courses

ENGL 180 Introduction to FilmENGL 180 Introduction to Film
McQuillen crn 57551

Pre-req. ENGL 101. Counts as humanities or liberal arts elective for students of any major and for the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Film is one of the three universal languages, the other two: mathematics and music. --Frank Capra

Film as dream, film as music. No art passes our conscience in the way film does, and goes directly to our feelings, deep down into the dark rooms of our souls. --Ingmar Bergman

Film…what is it about these dancing images that makes them so universal or something that penetrates our souls? Why do we spend countless hours arguing the merits of one film over another? Which is the better musical, the fun loving, crowd pleaser The Greatest Showman or the vibrant, romantic and melancholy masterpiece Moulin Rogue (we all know it's Moulin Rogue!)? How exactly do we talk about film in a manner that melds both our personal passions with those of academic discourse? ENGL 180 aims to answer these questions via the study of a wide range of films and film language at the introductory level. Students will learn the importance of terms like mise-en-scene, editing, sound, cinematography, and apply them to old classics such as Jaws and 2001: A Space Odyssey to more recent classics like Ex Machina and La La Land. So, if you have a desire to know more about what makes films tick, take ENGL 180: Intro to Film!


ENGL 211 Editing and Publishing Practicum-The PenENGL 211-001 Editing and Publishing Practicum—The Pen Malphrus crn 53366

Pre-req. ENGL 102 and 200-level English course (may be co-req.) or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times. [When taken 3 times, the credits count toward humanities program requirement; otherwise, credits are applied as electives.]

"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." ~Benjamin Franklin

The Pen, a publication of the USCB Society of Creative Writers, features fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, short plays, and artwork created by USCB students. In this one hour credit course, students will solicit calls for creative works, evaluate submissions, design page and journal layouts, copyedit pieces accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize and promote the journal on campus and in the community. Beyond offering you firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the culmination of the course each semester will be completion and publication of the journal itself.


ENGL 211-002 Editing and Publishing PracticumENGL 211-002 Editing and Publishing Practicum—May River Review
Barnes & Hoffer crn 53358

Pre-req. ENGL 102 and 200-level English course (may be co-req.) or permission of the instructor. 1 credit hour; students may repeat this course up to 6 times. [When taken 3 times, the credits count toward humanities program requirement; otherwise, credits are applied as electives.]

Are you interested in learning about editing and publishing? going to graduate school? finding an audience for the research that students do at this university? Yes?! Then English 211 is the perfect 1-credit-hour class for you. English 211 is designed to introduce students to important practices in interdisciplinary research through their work on the May River Review, USCB's interdisciplinary critical journal. Students will compose calls for essays, solicit and peer review submissions, update style guides, design page and journal layouts, copyedit articles accepted for publication, and organize strategies to publicize the journal in our community. Beyond offering firsthand experience for future internships and positions in editing and publishing, the ultimate goal of the course is the launch and promotion of the fourth issue and the production of the fifth. Don't miss the chance to be part of our staff and to put your signature on our journal! (no required course texts).


ENGL 222 Creative Writing Across the CurriculumENGL 222 Creative Writing Across the Curriculum Malphrus crn 53376

Pre-req. ENGL 102 or instructor consent. Counts as humanities program requirement, toward the Creative Writing Minor, or as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

"Writing is an exploration. You start from nothing and learn as you go." ~E.L. Doctorow

Ready to explore? Then this is the course for you. English 222 is a sophomore level creative writing workshop designed to give students of all majors the platform to experiment with their creativity and curiosity using words. We'll dabble with fiction, poetry, playwriting, and creative nonfiction (true stories told well) – and we'll read examples of each. Your critical thinking skills and expertise as writer, reader, analyzer, and articulator will be polished. Ours will be an intimate classroom setting where students and professor alike give and receive feedback on creative works in progress. All you need are English 101, 102, and a desire to mess around with words.


ENGL B287 American Literature Survey
Barnes crn 53356

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

What does it mean to be an American? to represent life in the United States in 1776? 1850? 1929? 2019? In this survey, we'll develop an encompassing reading knowledge of U.S. Literature and complement that reading knowledge with an appreciation for literary historical periods and contexts. Our survey will cover the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, including the nationalist period; Romantic and Renaissance Americana; Civil-War fiction, nonfiction, and poetry; realism; naturalism; modernism, and post-modernism; among other intellectual movements. As we move from cultural epoch to cultural epoch, we'll see writers contend—often self-consciously—with Americanness in past, present, and future tenses. I'll emphasize watershed moments in American history/literary history in lectures and discussions, and you'll be held accountable for identifying authors and texts with their respective periods. We'll capitalize on our wide chronological scope and use it to study the ways American writers remember and revise one another. By stressing American writers' revisionist impulses, we'll also ensure that our understanding of U.S. letters is diverse. Our emphasis on memory will challenge us to think critically about representations of race, gender, and class, but also our ever-unfolding identities as local, national, and global citizens. Our course texts will include The Norton Anthology of American Literature (Shorter Edition Volumes 1 & 2; 978-0393930580) and digital archives/materials available on Blackboard.


ENGL B288 English Literature IENGL B288 English Literature I
Kilgore crn 53361

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

The British and the World. One reason to care about early literature in early versions of the English language: on March 29, 2019, the United Kingdom (UK) is scheduled to exit the European Union (EU), a.k.a., to "leave Europe," "Brexit." The debate about Brexit has largely been cultural, about the UK's relationships with the rest of the world and its tensions within (can you call this Brexit if the majority of Scots didn't want to leave?; how does it feel to be both Black and British when English white nationalism is on the rise?), and has controversially drawn upon the foundation myths and literary notables of British history: King Arthur, Shakespeare, Chaucer, Henry VIII, Elizabeth the First, and the Second. Even the nearly thousand-year old Bayeux Tapestry, made to celebrate the Norman Conquest of Britain, has become a diplomatic point of contention. Using "Brexit" as a point of departure, this course will provide you an overview of British literatures, cultures, and histories from the ancient stone circles to just before 1800. You will build your skills and confidence in literary reading, interpretation, and analysis. You will be encouraged to explore and question ideas of culture, history, aesthetics, and literature (specifically the literary study of "British" views of the individual in society, and the possibilities for varieties of social justice), to test these ideas against your own thinking and experience, and to build skills in reading, writing, and presentation. We will read Beowulf; Anglo-Saxon elegies and dirty jokes; some Arthurian romance, Chaucer, Shakespeare, and Milton; and a lot of poetry about conquest and struggle and love and leaving from as diverse a group of authors that we can manage. We will explore the "People of Color in European Art History" blog. On one day in class, you will host your own news program, or The View (maybe wearing a costume?) and report from within a text we are reading (we will assume they have the technology.) How we think about "Britain" across time has profound implications for how we understand American literatures, cultures, histories, institutions, ourselves; the narratives we tell about ourselves and our societies matter -- this course will build your skills, your confidence, and is part of that exploration. Text: Norton Anthology of English Literature, 10th edition, Volumes A, B, and C. (WW Norton, 2018). See the flyer!


ENGL B289 English Literature IIENGL B289 English Literature II
Hoffer crn 53359

Pre-req. ENGL 102. For both English majors, this is one of the 5 required 200-level survey courses. For minors, this is an option for one of your 201+ courses. Also counts as a liberal arts general ed. elective for students of any major!

Living & Learning in British Literature since 1789. ENGL 289 is open to students from all majors and offers a survey (a broad overview) of major writers and works of British literature from the late 18th to the 21st century. In spring 2019, we will be guided in our grand tour of this literary tradition by a pair of interrelated central questions: 1) How did the British conceive of different forms of and approaches to education and learning in everyday life? and 2) What role could reading and writing, nature and art, play in the development of an individual, of a community, and of a nation? Along the way, we will study important disciplinary terminology as well as encounter major literary movements and cultural moments, exploring the contexts as well as the texts that have come to define them. Required: The Broadview Anthology of British Literature: Concise Volume B, 2nd edition (ISBN 9781554811335), with a few additional texts still under consideration!


ENGL/THEA 302 Theater History II
Pate crn 53383 (ENGL)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as well as theater minor as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We'll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We'll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We'll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater's desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We'll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don't let the 2 fool you; there's no need to take Theater History 1 before you take this course.


ENGL 410 18th Century LiteratureENGL 410 18th Century Literature
Hoffer crn 53360 

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a PRE-1800 course or upper-division elective.

Adventures in 18th Century Literature. ENGL 410 will take students on a comprehensive journey through the literature of the 18th century, specifically from the accession of George I and the publication of Alexander Pope's revised The Rape of the Lock in 1714 to the start of the French Revolution in 1789. We will organize our reading around the concept of adventure, encountering the daring spirit of 18th century authors whose lives, views, and (most importantly, for us) writing exemplify the boldness to question, challenge, and innovate within the prevailing opinion and style of their time. We will also plot our course among poetry and prose that depict some form of adventure—from a shipwreck on the high seas, or the terrors of a gothic castle, to the complexities of city-life and high society. Along our way, as we encounter various groups and movements (such as the Augustans, Graveyard Poets, the founders of the English novel) and study a variety of important techniques and genres (satire, sentimental, gothic, epistolary, etc.), we will explore how the greatest adventures of 18th century literature are about discovering what it means to be human. As we survey 18th century concepts of personhood and citizenship against their cultural context concerning gender, class, race, religion, trade, law, science, war, and national identifications, we will connect these to the contemporary ideologies of our own, global terrain in the 21st century. Required texts to include Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, Horace Walpole's gothic The Castle of Otranto, and Fanny Burney's Evelina, as well as The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Vol. C: The Restoration and the Eighteenth Century.


English 420 Transatlantic LiteratureEnglish 420 Transatlantic Literature
Barnes crn 53407

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

Armchair Travel. Why do people write travelogues? do people think about the world (or their place in the world) differently when travelling? In this transatlantic literature course, we'll study travelogues of many stripes—guidebooks, public and private letters, journals kept by authors in fictional and nonfictional poses, diaries, short stories, and "international novels"—as texts that demonstrate how elusive words may be. People document their travels in many different contexts and for many different reasons, and yet at some point, almost all wanderlustful writers confess a sense of wordlessness. While many people begin travelogues to record their in situ impressions of artworks, landmarks, monuments, or other historical sites, many also find the process of transcribing impressions into paragraphs, sentences, dashed-off phrases to be almost impossible. Indeed, travelogues reveal writers' immediate diversions, tangents, failed articulations as often as they trace what are supposed to be lasting recollections. We'll take such rhetorical pauses seriously by studying the ways narrative expectations, conventions, and modes affect representations of travel. As we read excerpts from travelogues new and old, famous and almost anonymous, we'll linger over the surprising ways the trivial inspires the existential (or the other way around)—especially when we're away from home. We'll address the generic complexities of nonfiction travelogues, which often seem to be part tell-all, part tell-nothing, part autobiography, part documentary, part scrapbook, and part introspective meandering. As we read these nineteenth-century texts from home, in books and on screens, we'll think about how media affects meaning—how the rise of middle-class travel, what some have called the "not-so-grand-tour," reveals itself in texts that revise and resist literary forms/genres/modes. At the same time, we'll study the ways travel writing raises difficult—and increasingly urgent—questions about power; so our conversations will be necessarily intersectional. Our projects will cross guide books with smart phone maps; telegrams with instagrams; letters and postcards with snaps and updates; personal essays with much more public inscriptions. Ultimately, we'll consider how our own digital ephemera revive tropes from a century and a half ago when travelogues first came into widely circulated vogue.

Our travel guides will likely include Charles Dickens, Margaret Fuller, Henry James, Anna Jameson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Martineau, Fanny Trollope, and Mark Twain in starring roles; and cameos by some helpful interpreters: Mary Louise Pratt, James Buzzard. (Map of the World. By Anna M. Bullard. Boston. March 15, 1836. Western Hemisphere. Eastern Hemisphere. Image from the David Rumsey Map Collection.)


ENGL 427 Southern LiteratureENGL 427 Southern Literature
Malphrus crn 56771

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward either English major and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

"Whenever I'm asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one." ~ Flannery O'Connor

Who are the writers that have shaped Southern Literature? When did Southern Literature emerge? Where does the South begin and end – is it all about the Mason-Dixon Line? How can we tell if a particular text is Southern or not? Why do readers, writers, scholars, and the general public around the world continue to be fascinated by all things Southern? . . .These are some of the initial questions we'll address in this upper level seminar on Southern Literature. In addition to top guns such as William Faulkner and Flannery O'Connor, we will focus our attention specifically on South Carolina writers – from William Gilmore Simms to Henry Timrod to Mary Boykin Chesnut to Julia Peterkin to DuBose Heyward to James Dickey to Percival Everett to Josephine Humphreys to Dorothy Allison to Nikky Finney to Pat Conroy to Ron Rash – some briefly, others in more depth. Literary roots run deep in the Palmetto state, and we'll spend the semester digging around in them. Here are the novels we'll read: James Dickey, Deliverance (ISBN: 0-385-31387-X); William Faulkner, Go Down, Moses (ISBN: 0-679-73217-9); Gloria Naylor, Mama Day (ISBN: 0-679-72181-9); Ron Rash, One Foot in Eden (ISBN:0-312-42305-5); Pat Conroy, The Prince of Tides (ISBN-10: 0553268880). Please note: this is Post-1800 class or an elective.


ENGL 441 History of Literary Theory and CriticismENGL 441 History of Literary Theory & Criticism
Kilgore crn 53362

Pre-req. 200-level literature course. Counts toward the THEORY requirement for either English major, OR as an upper-division elective for all English majors and minors.

Literature & Justice. This course is an introduction to literary theory in the Western tradition from the Greeks onward. We will spend some time on the Greeks (Homer, Plato, Aristotle) because they frame the conversation to follow, and because these are "writers" that later writers—and students of them—will seek to disrupt. We will read a range of writers who have sought to describe what literature is and how it functions in society. Their conclusions are not obvious (and are often not really conclusions, but disruptions) and curious minds will be necessary for this odyssey. Our explorations will entertain many of the following questions: What is literature / fiction / myth / poetry? What is it good for? How is it dangerous? What is its relationship with truth? beauty? rhetoric? inspiration? craft? wisdom? power? the Other? justice? —especially justice. We'll read Emily Wilson's exciting new (feminist?) translation of Homer's Odyssey, Plato's Republic, Sophocles' Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, Butler's Parable of the Sower— the following are not lengthy—Aristotle's Poetics, Longinus' On Great Writing, Philip Sidney's Defence of Poesy, and (through small chunks of text on Blackboard) some Horace, Christine de Pizan, Kant, Shelley, Emerson, Hegel, Marx, Derrida, and Eagleton! Once the course is through, you'll have a good historical understanding of the debates and the means to enter into ongoing conversations about the roles of literatures in societies, and have a deep appreciation for how the concepts and practices of justice has always been central to these conversations. See the flyer
Click here for the course flyer and book list with ISBNs.


English 450 Modern English GrammarsEnglish 450 Modern English Grammars
Swofford crn 53406

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Required for the Secondary English Education major. Counts as an upper-division elective for the core B.A. in English and toward the Professional Writing Concentration or minor.

The very title of this course may cause some of you great anxiety. You may have been told that you're "not good at grammar," you may have had grades that were affected by your use of "grammar," or you may be worried that there are rules you should know but don't. Take heart! This course offers a different perspective on "grammar." All native speakers of English actually "know grammar" intuitively—that's how we're able to communicate with one another every day. What most of us struggle more with is identifying the rules or conventions of Standard Edited English. In this class, we will unpack the structures and systems of English so that you are able to explain what you know with more precise terminology. We will examine the gamut of English language variation, not so that we learn the "right" way to speak and write, but so that we understand the vast array of options that are available to us as English speakers. We will look at the patterns that comprise Standard English, but we'll also identify patterns in regional and social dialects like African-American English, Southern American English, and Chicano English. We'll then examine Global Englishes and speculate about the future of the language.

English is a wonderfully rich, robust, and idiosyncratic language, and understanding how it works gives us access to its fullest potential. When we understand how English works, how it is structured and the richness of its variety, we become aware of the possibilities it offers us as writers, as readers, and as speakers. We unlock its infinite creativity and its reassuring patterns. In this course, we'll ask questions like: Where do our "rules" come from? Why do we believe them? How and when do they change? Why can we say slower and cuter, but funner seems incorrect? Can we end a sentence with a preposition? This course fulfills one of the requirements for the B.A. in English with Secondary Education licensure, and it is one of options for the Professional Writing minor/concentration. All majors are very welcome in this course!


ENGL 465 Fiction WorkshopENGL 465 Fiction Workshop
Malphrus crn 53368

Pre-req. 200-level course, preferably ENGL 222, or instructor's consent. Counts toward the core B.A. in English as upper-division elective or toward the Creative Writing Concentration or minor. With permission from the instructor, can be taken twice for credit.

"The purpose of fiction is to help us answer the question we must constantly be asking ourselves: who do we think we are and what do we think we're doing?" ~Robert Stone

If this two part question makes your fingers twitch, then pack up your pen and paper (muses too!) and join us for a writing workshop that is designed to expand a student's awareness of, appreciation for, and ability to create works of fiction. The class is writing intensive with the goal of improving all writing and critical thinking skills. In addition, this course offers global perspectives by focusing on writers from around the world. Students will receive feedback from both professor and peers as we establish a community of writers in an intimate classroom setting. With permission from the instructor, ENGL 465 (like ENGL 464) can be taken twice for credit.

 

Interdisciplinary Studies Courses

IDST 260 Introduction to Medical & Health HumanitiesIDST 260 Introduction to Medical & Health Humanities [ONLINE, Full Term]
Leaphart crn 53365

Pre-req. ENGL 102 or instructor's consent. This course can also count toward the Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Have you ever thought about why health, healthcare, and medical topics are often associated with the words complex and perplexing? One key to understanding these topics is to consider that at the center of health and medicine is the human. This ONLINE class will use a variety of methods -including short videos, readings, and movies- to help students look deeply at complex systems they will assuredly experience during their lifetimes. No matter whether students will be concerned with the care of patients, or family members, or simply their own health care, this class allows students to dig deeper into the complexities and understand the ongoing tension between the biomedical and the biopsychosocial models to better prepare for the future. We'll use the humanities to explore those murky depths and reveal a better understanding of health and medicine, including but not limited to health disparities, health literacy, and cultural competencies. Students will also use that knowledge to move beyond the "online classroom" to analyze and engage in the systems of health and medicine in their communities. Whether you're interested in health and medicine from a professional vantage or you are looking for an interesting and relevant class, this is a great fit for your spring!


LBST B297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods IDST 297 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods [ONLINE, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53370

Pre-req. ENGL 102. This course is required for the Interdisciplinary Studies major or Interdisciplinary Film Minor.

Looking for a course that allows for maximum exploration of your ideas and your aspirations but takes up a minimal amount of your time? Ready to blog? Thinking of taking a major in one discipline (like Biology) and a minor in another (like English) and wondering how they'll work together? You're invited to take IDST B297: Introduction to Interdisciplinary Research Methods! You'll be blogging and thinking, all about what interests you and what you want to do! Come join us!


IDST 351 Beyond the Classroom: Community Project I [Hybrid, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53371

Pre-req. Interdisciplinary Studies major or instructor's consent; junior standing.

We're going to read to kids in elementary schools and get out in the community. We're going to talk about it and blog about it and do fun projects with the kids about how they see the community. We'll do some of this work online, and we'll meet in person as well.


IDST 497 Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies Among the Disciplines [ONLINE, Full Term]
McCoy crn 53372

Pre-req. Senior standing in Interdisciplinary Studies major.
Senior thesis course, required for IDST majors. Open to IDST majors ONLY.

 

Theater Courses

THEA 170 Fundamentals of Acting
Ricardo or Harris

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

You don't have to want to be a great actor to benefit from an acting class. The skills and techniques we cover—everything from healthy vocal practices to script analysis and greater awareness of physicality and movement—apply to a wide array of disciplines, careers, and other opportunities. This class starts with the basics of Stanislavski-based acting methodology, the standard in American actor training for over a century. Our work builds toward a final project in which students perform for the class small group scenes from major plays. Students are also asked to write a final paper in which they discuss how the skills they learn in the acting classroom apply to their interests and aspirations outside of theater.


THEA 200 Understanding & Appreciation of Theater
Harris crn 53352

Counts toward the theater minor and/or as a fine arts general education credit.

In an increasingly digital and media-saturated world, does theater still matter? This course explores the history and practice of theater and its relationship to broader cultural and social issues to empower students to answer that question (and, of course, to better appreciate theater). We'll look at Western theater's roots as a practice of civic engagement, learn about how theater is made today and the various roles that contribute to its creation, and try to understand what theater's place can be in broader discourse. In studying theater practices as varying as community theater, Broadway musicals, and Southeast Asian dance dramas, students will cultivate the tools needed to assess the role that theater plays in shaping not only our perception of the world but also the world itself.


THEA/ENGL 302 Theater History II
Pate crn 53384 (THEA)

Pre-req. ENGL 102. Counts toward the theater minor. Also counts toward both English majors, and all English minors as a POST-1800 course or upper-division elective.

This course follows three major strains of influence in Western theater since 1800: the dramatic, the lyric, and the epic. We'll see how realism transforms from radical and scandalous experiment to oppressive and banal norm. We'll explore the various (and variously successful) attempts to translate artistic movements such as symbolism, expressionism, and surrealism onto the stage. We'll discuss the political motives behind Epic Theater's desire to continuously remind the audience of the fictive nature of theater instead of allowing them to be drawn into the performance. We'll also explore how popular theater forms ranging from musical theater to melodrama respond to and help shape the more avant-garde theatrical movements. Reading assignments in this class often encourage students to use their textbooks and any other resources they can find to learn about a particular person or topic rather than provide a range of pages to read. The class culminates in a research paper in which students identify and engage with some ongoing discourse surrounding one of the topics or texts we cover. And don't let the 2 fool you; there's no need to take Theater History 1 before you take this course.


THEA 333 Directing
Ricardo crn 53388

Pre-req. THEA 170 or instructor's consent. Counts toward the theater minor.

What do directors do? They conceptualize productions. They communicate with actors, designers, producers, and audiences. They read and interpret scripts. They are managers and teachers and artists and custodians of texts and iconoclasts. This class will train you in the art of directing plays while also asking you to study that role, its history, its challenges, its opportunities, its implications for how and why we make theater. You will start with simple assignments such as arranging actors in space to create a stage picture and build toward the final project of directing an entire scene from a play. You will also write a report on a professional director that analyses her directing style and methods.